Taps Gallery Part III


This gallery honors Vietnam Veterans who have recently made their last patrol and also the anniversary dates of those who died in country. Please submit names and other information to Bill McBride using this automatic form to have a brother or sister listed.

If you knew someone who is listed here and would like to add to the tribute, please send it to me using the form.



Al and daughter Gina, 11/99

Alfonse Costanza
U.S. Army
101st Airborne, B Co., "Strike Force"
1966-1969
01/30/47 ~ 03/07/99

Alphonse died from Lung Cancer as a result of exposure to Agent Orange (100% servivce-connected).

He will be laid to rest in the Columbarium at Arlington National Cemetery on May 28, 1999.

Your battle didn't end in Vietnam, it had just begun. You fought until the very end my love, now it is time for you to finally be at peace, emotionally and physically. Not a day, hour or second goes by where I don't miss you.

Your children, Al and Gina cherish their memories and miss you dearly. When I bring you to your final resting place, I will do so with tears in my eyes because I miss you so, but I will leave at peace knowing your suffering has finally ended. You'll always be my "Trooper", kid.

I Love you,

Your wife, Susan


WILLIAM F. COUGHLIN
PFC. U.S. ARMY
DIED SEPTEMBER 9, 1998
VIETNAM VETERAN
HOLBROOK, MA.

My brother never talked about Viet Nam. I was eleven when he left. It was January 1967. He was in the 1st Med BN, 1st Inf. Div. He returned to live a quiet life. He remained in our family home where he died. Billy was devoted to his father and five younger sisters. A caring, sensitive man.

I found some of his letters as we cleaned my father's home in preparation to sell it (our Dad died six months prior to Billy).

It would mean a great deal to me to talk to someone who knew him in Nam. Although I will never understand that experience I want to know as much about my brother as I can. I am struggling with this loss, the guilt and sadness. My brother's death was a suicide. We miss him very much.

If anyone knew Billy please contact me at mailto:VFC4254@AOL.COM

His loving sister,

Ginny


Bill Akins
U.S. Navy
Vietnam Veteran

A true friend and brother died last month. His name was Bill Akins, we served with MCB 71 of the U.S. Navy Seabees and did two tours of Nam. Bill was wounded at Phu Loc on our second tour. He was a great husband, father and friend. He died in Columbus, OH from Pancreatitus. He will be missed greatly.

'Til we meet again. God Bless you Bro!!!!

Jerry "Cupo" Montecupo


Herbert Eugene Belcher
GMG1, U.S. Navy
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 31 March 1969

This is for my uncle. His name is Herbert Eugene Belcher. He was stationed in Vietnam 01-29-1969 and was killed 03-31-1969. He was a navy gunners mate, and he was killed in the Province of Vinh Binh by artillery, rocket or mortar.

His rank was GMG1, his serial# 2699698.

I would appreciate any information anyone has on him.

Thank you

Albert Miner


Ronald J. Ray
L/Cpl. U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 12 August 1969

Lance Corporal Ronald J Ray was killed in action on August 12,1969

This is my uncle I never got to meet. When he died I was just a baby. My family has told me that he gave his life to save one of his friends that got wounded in the war. Even thought I never meet this man I will always be proud to be his niece.

I now am a mother of three children that he will never know but they will be told of their great uncle and how he gave his life to help someone else.

Uncle Ronny I will always love you.


Sgt. WILLIAM D. CRAWFORD
SFC CO. D, 6 INF-198 INF. BDE
JAN. 17, 1939-MARCH 13, 1968
NORTH CAROLINA
VIETNAM
ARMY COM-PH

My dad died at the hands of a sniper in Vietnam when I was only 6 months old, but there is not a day that passes that I can't help but to wonder what my life would be like today if my dad was alive.

God Bless you Dad...


Stephen Lee Traughber
Corporal, USMC
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 10 September, 1967

In memory Of Cpl. Stephen Lee Traughber, USMC. Hometown, New Albany, Indiana.

KIA September 10, 1967 in Quang Tri Province, South VietNam. Steve was TAD from Co. "E" Kamiseya, Japan. Steve always did his best and gave his all for our country.

Semper Fi Steve.

A friend and fellow Marine,

William R. O'Brien


Robert Lee Dyas
U.S. Air Force
Vietnam Veteran
October 14, 1947 to April 21. 1999

My Uncle. Robert Lee Dyas, passed away on the 21st of april,1999. after a long battle with cancer. Uncle Bobby served in Viet Nam from 1968-1969.

He shipped out of Shepard, Air force Base. He was proud to have served. Uncle Bobby didn't talk about Nam much when i was small, but as i grew older, i discovered some of the horror that he had gone thru, and still tried to live with till he died. You see, he used to load the Agent Orange on the planes,and helped to patch the planes when they would come in all shot to doll rags. And watch as they took the bodies out, knowing that he could do nothing. He did his time, and now, after more than 30 years, has finally found his peace.

If anyone remembers serving with him, please contact me at: heavenschild@tds.net

AND THE ANGELS TOOK HIM HOME.

Submitted by Debbie Collins (Woore)


R.B. Teague, Jr.
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died 15 February 1999

In memory of R. B. Teague, Jr. who passed away February 15, 1999 at the age of 49. He was with the 573rd Transportation Company Fort Story, VA .

R. B. received the following medals while serving his country: National Defense Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal w/60 Device, The PURPLE HEART. He was also a Green Beret and with the 101ST Airborne.

He will be sadly missed by his family and friends. As will all of the fine young men that gave a part of themselves to protect and serve their country and loved ones. Junior was a great person and a wonderful father to two girls: Bridgette and Teresa. A friend and brother to 7 sisters: Barbara Sewell, Ann Tooley, Ellizabeth Harrell, Charlotte Sloan, Diane Zea, Janie Wilkins, and Sue Sanders; 1 brother Johnny Teague. Father R. B. Teague Sr. passed away in September of 1998.

During the pass six months, I was honored to be able to listen to Junior talk about some of his experience in the War. I was told how he lead his troop to safety after a surprise attack and was shoot himself. I remember watching the news during the war to see if we could see him, and a time or two we were able to. Junior carried his experience with the Army around with him all the time, it was something he couldn't talk about for the longest time, except with his fellow countrymen that served. He never forgot his fellow men and either should we.

Let's all take time out of busy lives and remember those loved ones that were very so brave and fought a war that changed their and ours lives forever, for it is an experience that no man will ever and should never forget.

Junior, you will be sadly missed by each and everyone of your family and friends, but you will never be forgotten for the bravery and love you gave to those close to you. You are now in heaven and God will take care of you

May you now rest in peace.

In loving remembrance from your family,

Elizabeth Harrell, Barbara Sewell, Ann Tooley, Charlotte Sloan, Diane Zea, Jennifer Todd, Deborah Smith, Jon Harrell


Thomas E. Spitzer
LTJG U.S. Navy
Vietnam Veteran
Died October 6 1966

In loving memory of: Thomas E. Spitzer
LTJG US Navy
Born: July 17, 1941
Died: October 26, 1966 aboard USS Oriskany during the fire.

Always in my thoughts.

Submitted by Steve Kappes


To those who died at the 24th Evac. Hospital
and to their families and friends
Vietnam Veterans all

This is a tribute to all the BOYs who died at the 24th evac hospital. Not a day goes by without some memory of my time as a physician at the 24th evac. My heart and soul go to all the members of the families of those who died there. Those of us who served, the doctors, nurses, corpsmen. etc. will never forget what we saw and lived through. It is only to each other that we can talk and try desperately to find out why.

So to all of you I say thank you for allowing me to do my best in caring for you and as I do now as a part time VA doc. I feel for you all, for the PTSD, the artifical legs,, the stories you have told me that I keep in confidence.

I still vividly see the 24th evac every night in my thoughts or dreams and when the pressure of the memories gets to great, I push myself into the VIP room which was dark, cold with great air conditioning, and allowed me to unload the memories of the horrid visions.

Thanks for letting me write this in anonymity and letting me help get some of the demons out of my mind. I too cry almost daily for the losses and the knowledge that such youthfulness was never allowed to grow old and raise families, etc.

Many of us say that those who died were the lucky ones who do not relive the memories over and over.

The writer served as a doctor in Vietnam and wishes to remain anonymous


Cpl. Raymond D. Regier
US Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
Feb. 6 1949- Feb. 5, 1970

The day before my cousins 21st Birthday he was KIA. He was flying aboard a UH-1H helicopter in route from Chu Lai to Doc Pho when got a request for assistance from a soldier who had been swept to sea. He located the drowning man and began helping him aboard. A large wave struck them, knocking both men into the water. Cpl. Regier immediatly swam to the side of his comrade and kept him afloat intell he was safely aboard the helicopter. While trying to pull himself into safety, he was struck by another wave and disappeared into the sea. They found his body 3 days later.

"His courageous actions were directly responsible for saving the life of his fellow soldier."

He participated in 25 rescue missons while serving in Vietnam. He recieved the Soldiers Medal for heroism, two Air Medals, Army Commendation Medal, and the Good Conduct Medal. They were awarded to his family upon his death.

He died proud for the country that he loved. I never meet my courageous cousin, he died before I was even born. I have heard many stories about him ever since I was born. He was a door gunner with the 174th Aviation Company. I would love to hear from anyone that remembers anything about my cousin.

Please email me atmailto:%20loretta_z@hotmail.com

We all miss you and love you Ray!! Rest in peace.



Robert Lee Crowder, Jr.
MSGT U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died 7 December 1998

Silver Fox will carry on! Vietnam Veteran who served two tours.

My father msgt Robert L. Crowder served his two tours in vietnam while in the army. he retired from the army in 1974. he also served in the navy during the korean conflict. he was totally dedicated to the army in which he so proudly served and to his family, especially his eleven grandchildren.

thank you for your time and efforts to honor those who served. they deserve every accolade bestowed upon them. as a kid growing up in the military you are painfully aware of the sacrifices soldiers make for their country. it takes a special breed of individual to serve. thanks to everyone who has served this great country the past 230 years. today is here because of your duty and honor to this country. thank you

God bless all those who served.


Gary Alfred Rust
SP4, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 11 November 1969

My Brother:
Name: Gary Alfred Rust
Age: 21... When killed in Nam...
Year killed... 1969, In the fall...
Town Southbridge, Mass.
Rank in Army: Spec 4
Mothers name Ada Merrill Franklin (maiden name... Rust/married name...)
Fathers name Murel Jason Rust...
Lots of brothers
Lots of sisters

I am one of his baby brothers. My name is Neil Rust and I would like to let you know that there are people in this country that remember vividly a terrible time in America's past. I never really knew my big brother and somehow I feel cheated. I am sure had he survived the bullets in vietnam... He would have been an awesome human being... I guess it's been a long time since we've come across a web site of this kind... and this time I just had to say something about my/our brother Gary...

There are few of my brothers and sisters left, coming from 16 brothers and sisters, made for a rather full, yet humble childhood... Myself ... I am in my 40's now, and look back to see what a full and rewarding life we've all had... I am sure it would not have been so rewarding, had the brave and strong not served their country when they were needed the most...

I will always remember my brother Gary Rust... Even though I never really knew him... If you can find any more info on Gary Rust, from Southbridge, Mass., killed in Vietnam in or around the fall of 1969... Please let me know via the email addess at... drgnslyr@cwnet.com or
mailto:judithrust@netscape.net

From his sister Judy Rust


Richard E. O'Neal
SFC, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
9 July 1944 to 12 May 1998

My brother was a special person to me. I have many fond memories of my big brother. He served his country in the armed forces for about 20 years and had at least two tours in Vietnam. He was an Infantryman and an Ammunitions Specialist. He didn't talk much about his time overseas, but we (his family) and friends could tell that it haunted him.....

We feel that with all the young boys saw and did over there, it was amazing that most of them continued to lead a fairly "common" life. Richard was a care free guy and lived that way, but he never really "came home" to us. We feel he lost his life in Nam, but just left us in May 1998.

I really appreciate all of those that served there and my heart goes out to the families that didn't have theirs come back....I am lucky that I did get more time with Richard, but I still miss him. It has been almost a year and the pain is still too fresh.

After losing my brother in May, I also had to say good bye to my Mom in October 98. She never really recovered from the death of Richard...a parent isn't supposed to bury a child...she, I think, died of a broken heart as well as other things. We are getting thru, but with the help of our Lord and the support of our family and friends...and people like you that make it possible to tell others how we feel about our loved ones .

Thank you.

Kat
Sister to Richard E O'Neal


Samuel L. James
Captain, U.S. Air Force
Vietnam Veteran
MIA/KIA 18 April 1973

Today, 03/25/1999, I received from my cousin and her daughter, a letter that opened up some very old memories, some fond, some not so fond. Tonight, I sit and ponder and try to explain to myself the injustice of the fate of Capt. Samuel L. James, USAF, MIA 04/18/1973.

I met Sam James when I was 9 or 10 years old. He was a wonderful man, and I was so impressed by his uniform. It left a very lasting impression on me.

Capt. James was the WSO in an F4E piloted by Capt. Douglas Martin. Their aircraft went down in Cambodia on 04/18/1973. The policy of his squadron was that they did not wear rescue beepers. Radar and Radio contact was lost with the craft, and none of the wingmen saw it crash. More than 700 square miles were searched, and only a fresh gash in the thick jungle was found where the aircraft apparently went down.

Days later, there was a broadcast by Cambodia, that Capts. James' and Martin's charred bodies were discovered at the crash site. This broadcast was disputed, and dismissed by the US Government as propaganda to my cousin, and Capt. James' family.

That summer, as a boy of 14 years of age, I can remember the pain and anguish my cousin suffered, and their very young daughter that could not comprehend why everyone was so sad. I remember the countless trips to Southeast Asia made by my cousin and Capt. James' family to try to find any information of his whereabouts and status.

Finally, during the summer of last year, an extraction team recovered human remains at the crash site, which subsequently turned out to be the combined remains of Capts. James and Martin according to government and civilian forensics. For my cousin and her daughter, this finally brings a closure to the fate of their beloved Sam. For me, it rocked me.

I felt such sorrow for a man I barely knew, having met him some 31 years ago. I wore his MIA bracelet until he was declared KIA/BNR in 1975. At the same time, I felt a rage boil up in me. Based on the information I can put my hands on, it appears that our Government not only denied any knowledge of his status, but made every effort to cause his family great grief and distress for 26 years with misleading information and false hope. In the documentation I could find, there was a letter from his sister, whom I have never met, dated 01/02/1999 in which she expresses much the same feelings as I regarding the Government's behavior. All that remained to identify Sam was 10 teeth and a dog tag, presumably and reportedly found at the crash site by the excavation team last summer.

I can only say that I believed Sam to be dead many years ago. But not knowing for sure for 26 years, and having to find out by a letter out of the blue from my cousin was almost more than I could take. I felt such emptiness, and such betrayal by our Government. For the first time in my life, I tasted a very small drop in the vast ocean of misery that the families and loved ones of the heroes who paid the ultimate price for their country. I don't know how they have survived the grief.

For Sam, we miss you. YOU ARE NOT FORGOTTEN.

Submitted by Tim Straughn


Edward W. Rusin, Jr.
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
Died 3 August 1998

This is a picture of my brother Edward W. Rusin, Jr. who served in the U.S.M.C. proudly in Vietnam, who came home to no hero's welcome, who saw in Vietnam what many of us would or could not ever forsee...What he saw in Vietnam and how Vietnam effected his life I wil never know...but on August 3, 1998 he took his own life and hanged himself in his own garage...He often told me "Bobbi" you don't know what I've seen or done, and I know I don't know and never will...

He came home a different person, and a year after he was home his best friend, childhood buddy, was killed in Da Nang on the airstrip trying to run for cover...What these boys went thru and what they saw over there can never ever be comprihended by us...

God Bless All of them, Living or Dead..

A poem dedicated to Edward

My Brother

This is a story of my brother Eddie
a man that was willing, able and ready
to defend his country in Vietnam
and came home to a country unable to calm
the truth of why they were there.....
Some say it was to free the Vietnamese, but in all reality
who did we please?
Was it Big Government trying to hold, onto the riches
of the unfortold--men of riches, men of wealth,
men who couldn't fight because of health,
Or was it very very political,
send our boys, so typical!!
Send the young men, what they got?
Just starting out---not a lot,
that they could have accomplished so young in their lives,
But look at us, we got husbands and wives....
They will go there and they will fight,
some will come home, others may never see the light...
of a new day dawning, their babies cry, their wives fright...
So send them on to Vietnam, and let us sleep another nite...
And, if they make it, if they come home,
don't worry abut them, cuz some will roam, some
to the bars some to the ghetto, and who will care....
we won't let'em, have a feeling of doing good,
we'll knock them down, as we should....
Baby killers, they were called, and the whole word
was intralled that someone from the U.S.A. could do
that to some country so far away.....
Home they came trying to adjust
to a world that only felt disgust,
for what they had believed in, what they had done,
it mattered no more they were ONE...
All stick together all believe that what they did
they did for humanity!


Submitted by his sister Bobbi


John (Jack)Konrad
U.S. Air Force
Vietnam Veteran
1 November 1946 - 29 March 1999

john (jack) konrad born november 1, 1946 died march 29, 1999 . he enlisted in the air force in 1967. jack first served as a medic at otis air force base,cape cod, mass.. he loved this country and was proud to wear his uniform in a time when this country was anything but proud of him.

when he received his orders for ton son nhut air base,south viet nam, my mother elizabeth became another casualty. why my son ,when no other mothers she knew were sending there sons. that war took a piece out of her.

jack just died of cancer.

he leaves behind a wife who loved him very much and four great kids, john 22, margaret 18, tim 16 and andrew 11. his mother and father a sister and a brother. jack always did his duty and much much more.

God you'll be missed very much

Submitted by T. Konrad


Ronnie Sinclair
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran

My friend Ronnie Sinclair, for reasons known only to God and himself, chose to end his life after years of coping. There should be a wall for the ones that were so tortured that they could no longer endure this life or the feelings of the things they saw and did. That body count will never be told. Ron 49 years old.

Farewell old marine.

Submitted by a friend


Thomas Patrick Noonan Jr.
L/Cpl-USMC
KIA 5 February 1969
MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIANT

A young life taken too soon. Tommy died while saving others. He will live on and on and he is remembered in his hometown with a playground named in his honor. He and all the rest will never be forgotten.

Submitted by Peggy Gernon

Note: The link above has a nice picture of Tommy Noonan along with other tributes and his MOH citation


Donald Gene Lanham
L/Cpl. U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 19 August 1969

In memory of my brother.Donald Gene Lanham. killed on marble mountain August 19, 1969.

God bless the dead.

Submitted by his sister, Brenda Crom


SSgt. Howard Ray Bailey
December 30, 1942 - April 13, 1999
U.S. Army, Co. C, 1/61 Infantry, 5th Division
Vietnam Veteran, 1969, Purple Heart recipient
Died from cancer

Vietnam veteran Howard Ray Bailey died in Battle Ground, WA of cancer. He is survived by his wife, Ann, three daughters, and five grandsons.

He did two tours of Vietnam, the last one being in 1969, and I am unsure of when the other tour was.

He was a loving person who will be greatly missed by those who knew him.

His hobby was collecting military memorabilia.

Submitted by Nancy Moore


Colonel Ted Guy
U.S. Air Force
Vietnam Veteran
Former POW
Died: 23 April, 1999

A Tribute to Ted from Swede Larson, one of Ted Guy's many friends.

It is with deep regret, that I inform you of the death of Col. Ted Guy. He passed away today, 23 April 1999, from complications associated with Lukemia. He only lived 6 months from the time of his first symptoms. He is survived by his wife Linda, two step daughters, four son's, and a brother.

Since most of you did not know Ted, and a few misunderstood him, I am going to ask your indulgence, and tell you a little about him, since I was his very close friend for 44 years.

We first met at Luke Air Force base in 1955 as young Captains instructing fighter gunnery. He had previously completed a combat tour in Korea, flying F-84's. He and I had three things in common. We both loved to fly, party, and fish. Over the years we stayed in close touch, and after his retirement, we fished together many times.

He was assigned to South Vietnam in F-4's while I was in Thailand flying out-country missions, in F-105's. When he showed up in Hanoi, I couldn't fathom how he had gotten there. After we were released, I learned that he was shot down during the battle at Khe Sanh, bailed out and captured in Laos by the North Vietnamese (they were never in Laos! -yah, right!). On the second day of his capture while he was starting his walk to Hanoi, he was heavily sprayed with Agent Orange. In the ensuing days, he walked through many areas that had been previously defoliated.

As he was captured in Laos, he was kept away from the rest of us and spent his first 3 years in solitary confinement. He was then put in with the 100 plus, Army and civilian prisoners and was the Senior Officer. He had his hands full with a group of very young, non-motivated and rebellious enlisted men. Unlike our group, (after the death of HO), he was badly treated by his captors, almost up to our release. He was badly beaten during this time for acting as SRO and on one occasion, suffered severe head injuries, which several years later resulted in his being medically

discharged from the service. He had been on the "fast track" prior to shoot down, and had been promoted to Lt. Col. below the zone. To my knowledge, he was the only POW promoted (to 06) below the zone while a POW. Those concussions he suffered forced his early retirement.

He was not an active member of our group, primarily because he did not know or serve with any of us in Hanoi. He also felt that even though our group elected to be non-political, we should have made an exception and taken a prominent stand as a potential powerful lobby group, to demand a full accounting of the MIA's. He was an individual of deep loyalties, and a boundless love of his country and flag. He stood up tall against those he felt were in the wrong.

His medical specialists felt that his Lukemia was a direct result of his repeated heavy exposures to Agent Orange. The Veterans Administration however, in their infinite wisdom felt otherwise, and denied his emergency claim for Agent Orange disabilities. (Hence no DIC for his wife).

He ended up loosing a promising military career and suffered an early end to his life, in his service to his country. I shall truly miss him.

Thanks for your indulgence.

GBU Ted.
SWEDE LARSON

SWEDE LARSON

swede@texas.net


Lloyd W. Norris
Vietnam Veteran
08 - 02 - 44
02 - 04 - 99

Dad served 8 years in the United States Army and 4 years in the Marines. Died of a massive heart attack. Will always be remembered and so will his love of his motor cycles and Rock 'n' Roll. Miss ya dad.

May the road rise up to meet you,
May the wind be at your back.
May the sun shine warm upon your face,
The rains fall soft upon your fields,
And until we meet again.

RIDE TO LIVE
LIVE TO RIDE

KEEP ON RIDIN' DAD

Posted by JON A. BOWEN
mailto:rebeljon@hotmail.com


PFC ' SKIP' Grover Cleavland Bowen
United States Army
Gunner and Crew chief
09 - 20 - 48
KIA 02 - 19 - 69

This is in honor of my uncle. I never got the chance to meet him. Another of our boy's to serve proudly and not come home. In his own word's describin' the hell written day's before his death.

Take a man, then put him alone,
Put him 12,000 miles away from home;

Empty his heart of all but blood,
Make him live in sweat and mud.

This is the life I have to live
And why my soul to the devil I give;

You 'Peace boys' put from your easy chair,
But you don't know what it's like over here;

You have a ball without near trying,
While over here the boys are dying;

You burn your draft card and march at dawn,
Plant your flags on the White House lawn;

You all want to ban the bomb;
'There's no real war in Vietnam.'

You use your drugs and have yoiur fun,
Then you refuse to use a gun;

There's nothing else for you to do,
And I'm supposed to die for you?

I'll hate you to the day I die,
You made me hear my buddy cry;

I saw his arm, a bloody shred,
I heard them say: "This one's dead."

It's a large price he had to pay:
Not to live to see another day;

He had the guts to fight and die;
He paid the price, but what did he buy?

He bought your life by losing his,
But who gives a damn what a soldier gives?

HIs wife does, and maybe his son,
But they're just about the only ones.

So you put this man there, all alone,
And he died for you - 12,000 miles from home.

Your memory still lives on.....

posted by JON A. BOWEN
mailto:rebeljon@hotmail.com


Sam Wiscombe
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
Died April 4 1999

Gentlemen,
It's my sad duty to inform you that Sam Wiscombe, one of our members, passed away this morning. I guess Chesty figured Sam Sam could use a rest with him, after his long fight. The Association is sending flowers on behalf of all Marines who served in 2-3-3. If you would care to send your condolences to his wife we'll post the address on the web site to make that possible. What Sam wanted to do most was attend one of our reunions, unfortunately he never made it. I'm sure he'll be attending this year at Charlie Greer by his side.

Farewell Sam and Semper Fi.

Tom


Ronnie Sinclair
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran

My friend Ronnie Sinclair, for reasons known only to God and himself, chose to end his life after years of coping. There should be a wall for the ones that were so tortured that they could no longer endure this life or the feelings of the things they saw and did. That body count will never be told.

Ron was 49 years old. Farewell old Marine.


William C. Weiss, Jr.
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 6 May 1970

My Brother William C. Weiss, Jr. was killed in action on May 6, 1970. He was employing a smoke shield with another helicopter to allow the infantry to get their equipment in when his helicoptor was shot down and burned. Bill was 21 years, I was 13.

Bill was a much decorated soldier who served with the 101st Airborne division, as a Military Policeman and much more. He was packed to be shipped home when they asked for volunteers for one more mission. That mission turned out to be his last. I have been trying to piece together Bills military record as we found a red beret that the government won't tell us anything about other than we should be very proud of him.

Bill graduated from Palmyra High School in 1967 and joined the service immediately thereafter. He was a loving brother to me though I only had him a short time.

I would appreciate hearing from anyone who may have known Bill. We have a lot of pictures of the guys he served with but no names were ever attached.

Dale Skinner
Email Dale using this automatic email form

Note: We will post the pictures here as they become available (wgm)


Paul Jefferey Cochran
SP4, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 1 May 1968

The high school years of 1964-66 were better years for me because of Paul J. Cochran. He was a very sweet, and kind young man who treated me with kindness and caring when I was alone a lot. We talked and he dreamed making the world a better place for all people. I heard that Paul threw himself on a grenade to save several other people that were with him. If the story is true, it would be the Paul that I remembered wrote the poem. I felt a great sense of loss when I heard that Paul died and wrote the following poem for him: "Etched in Stone" and wish to also dedicate it to all those who were lost over there. I made my first and only trip to the traveling Wall this last Memorial Day to pay tribute to him and all those who died over there. It was a very emotional experience for me and left a copy of the poem with his picture on it at the Wall in Vancouver, Washington. It has left me with awe that I have now discovered that Paul was born on the same day as my oldest son and died the same year that son was born. God bless all those who died over there and may we honor and respect all those who served.

lynda arneson dokken


LCDR WILLIAM JOHN GARRITY
CATHOLIC CHAPLAIN
U.S.S. ORISKANY CVA 34

ON THE MORNING OF OCT 26 1966, A TERRIBLE FIRE BROKE OUT ON BOARD THE USS ORISKANY. THERE WAS MANY ACTS OF HEROISM THAT EARLY AM AT FIRST THERE REPORTS OF OVER 100 MEN KILLED, WHICH PROVED LATER ON TO BE 44 DEAD. "FATHER GARRITY" WAS AKIND AND GENTLE PERSON WHO ALWAYS HAD A WAY TO MAKE US ALL FEEL AT EASE.

ON THAT MORNING OF 26 OCT 66 A DAY WHICH WILL ALWAYS BE BURNED IN MY MIND A FIRE BROKE OUT IN THE FORWARD STARBOARD SIDE FLARE LOCKER. JUST A FEW FEET FROM WHERE I WAS STANDING. THE FIRE CAUSED BY TWO TIRED AND EXHAUSTED CREWMEN, THE FIRE QUICKLY ENGULFED BAY ONE. WHICH WAS LOADED FOR A MORNING RAID IN VIET WITH A-4S AND F-8S, AND HELOS FROM DIFFERENT SQUADRONS ON BOARD. FATHER GARRITY WAS RUNNING AROUND OFFERING HELP AND GIVING LAST RITES TO THOSE WHO DIED. HE WOULD RUN INTO THE FIRE AND BE TURNED BACK BY THE HEAT, THAT WOULD NOT STOP HIM.

HE MADE IT BACK TO THE "FIRE" BUT ONLY TO PERISH. THEIR HAS NOT BEEN A DAY IN MY LIFE THAT I HAVE NOT THOUGHT OF THAT DAY AND THE HEROISM OF "FATHER GARRITY" HE WILL ALWAYS REMAIN A HERO OF HEROES IN MY HEART.

GOD BLESS HIM AND THE REST OF THE CREW WHO DIED THAT DAY.

HE WHO IS DEAD WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN AS LONG AS WE REMEMBER THEM IN OUR HEARTS .

from a shipmate and friend


JIMMY LYNN SHELL
U.S. MARINE CORPS
VIETNAM VETERAN
DIED: 21 AUGUST 1998

MY MARINE...A FAREWELL SALUTE TO: UNITED STATES MARINE..JIMMY LYNN SHELL...DIED..8-21-1998..

INWARDLY WOUNDED IN COUNTRY..VIETNAM...1966-1968..P.T.S.D. SO RUGGED I HELD MY BELOVED IN THE NIGHT, AS HE WHIMPERED IN PAINFUL DREAMS..MY SOLDIER, SEMPER FI, I SO LOVE HIM, WE ALL DID...

THE HEART GAVE AWAY AT ONLY 48 YEARS OF AGE, ALONG WITH THE WEARY STRUGGLE, YET I FOUND THE PAPERS HE LEFT BEHIND FOR ME, FOR YOU, ALL OF YOU SOLDIERS, WE ARE ALL IN GODS ARMY THEY SAY, NEVER BREAK STRIDE, NO MATTER WHAT, STAY FOCUSED, KEEP YOUR EYES ON JESUS, THATS ALL THAT REALLY MATTERS BELOVED ONE...

PAPERS LEFT UNFINISHED, INTENDED TO OUTREACH TO OTHER HURTING VIETNAM VETS AND THEIR FAMILIES..GOD GAVE ME THIS VISION HONEY....ONLY HIS COMMANDER IN CHIEF ORDERED HIM TO REPORT HOME...TO HEAVEN.....PAPERS...COMMANDOS FOR CHRIST...

HE CALLED ME SOLDIER LADY.....YOU CAN DO IT, JAN. I DIDN'T UNDERSTAND...HE KNEW HE WAS DYING...SO RUGGED MY MARINE...SO GENTLE INSIDE, COVERED UP OF COURSE...(SMILE) HE WOULD WANT ME TO CONTINUE, SO MUST ALL OF YOU....WE MUST BE STRONG..WITH A GENTLE STRENGTH, THE KIND OF BOLD GENTLENESS THAT ONLY GOD CAN GIVE. THIS WORLD, GOVERNMENT , WELL ....JUST LOOK TO JESUS, O.K? I SO MISS YOU MY HUSBAND, MY MARINE....THE SOFT TOUCH OF MY HAND WILL NOT TRIGGER FLASHBACKS IN YOU ANYMORE, FOR YOU HAVE THE TOUCH OF THE MASTERS HAND UPON YOU...YOU SALUTE MY LORD FOR ME JIMMY...UNTIL ...I SEE HIM, AND YOU BELOVED....

I FEEL LIKE I HAVE BEEN TO VIETNAM MYSELF...THE STUFF YOU SAID, THE STUFF YOU DIDN'T SAY..THE LOUDNESS, THE SILENCE...ITS OVER....YOU ALWAYS SANG..THIS SONG YOU SAID GOD GAVE YOU..."GOTTA KEEP MARCHIN', MARCHIN; MARCHIN, MARCHIN THROUGH THIS LAND, GOTTA KEEP MARCHIN, MARCHIN, MARCHIN......NEVER COULD GET THE FINAL VERSE TO THAT SONG FOR THE LAST TWO YEARS ,,UNTIL...JUST BEFORE....YOU BURST INTO A BIG OLD SMILE FROM EAR TO EAR, JAN, HONEY, I GOT IT, GOD SAYS...KEEP ON MARCHIN....TIL I TAKE HOLD OF THE FATHERS HAND.....YOU SMILED, I STOOD STILL..8-21-99 YOUR FINAL FAREWELL SALUTE MY MARINE:

JIMMY LYNN SHELL, UNITED STATES MARINE CORP. VIETNAM...GOD SAW YOU THE WHOLE TIME THROUGH....SO FAREWELL, MARINE, YOU FOUGHT A GOOD FIGHT, YOUR RAN THE RACE, AND KEPT THE FAITH.....BELOVED...REST IN PEACE ...4-EVER COMMANDO, I AM PROUD OF YOU, AND IT REALLY DOESN'T MATTER THAT YOU DIDN'T GET YOUR 100% DISABILITY UNTIL AFTER YOU DIED, \ YOU GAVE 100 PER CENT IN VIETNAM, AND THE DAY YOU ENTERED THAT WAR YOU WERE COMPLETELY SERVICE CONNECTED. I AM SO GLAD THAT THERE IS NO "RED TAPE" WHERE YOU ARE DARLIN'....MY HEART GOES OUT TO ALL VETERANS EVERYWHERE....

ANYONE KNOWING MY JIMMY, MARINE : JIMMY LYNN SHELL...PLEASE RESPOND, HE WAS GONE TO DOMICILIARY CARE SO MUCH...PORTLAND OREGON , WHITE CITY, NORTH CAROLINA VA, LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS, BILUXI, MISSISSIPPI, LIKE SO MANY P.T.S.D. VETS. GOD BE WITH YOU ALL....IN LOVING MEMORY OF : COMMANDO FOR CHRIST: MARINE" "JIMMY LYNN SHELL" DIED: 8-21-98-BURIED IN LOUISIANA. FULL MILITARY HONORS, 21 GUN SALUTE..MY BELOVED BUDDY...MY MARINE.....MY HERO...MY HUSBAND....ROMANS 8:31 IF GOD BE FOR YOU ...WHO CAN BE AGAINST YOU? (ONE OF YOUR INTENDED COMMANDO FOR CHRIST BIBLE VERSES.

IF ANYONE OUT THEIR KNEW MY HUSBAND, OR IF YOU ALSO ARE A WIDOW, LETS KEEP IN TOUCH AND HELP EACH OTHER HELP EACH OTHER. EMAIL: encontacto@deltech.net

UNITED STATES MARINE: JIMMY LYNN SHELL ..VIETNAM VETERAN FAREWELL SALUTE..IS IN ORDER ...HERE... DIED 8-21-98


James L. Fain
Billy B. Day
William E. Parnell
Gary W. Garis
Richard H. Cassube
Daniel G. Stands
George Snodgrass
Danny Fernandez
Joseph Benton

This is but a short list of men who gave their lives to build an air base. A complete listing of those killed and wounded in Operation Clean Sweep and Operation Honolulu is available Here

The following citation was given to all those who served with these men. Others like SP4 Danny Fernandez Medal of Honor,(February 18,1966 Joseph Benton, (KIA February 18, 1966) and others who sacrificed there life later in the war are not covered in this list.

VALOROUS UNIT AWARD

The 2nd Brigade Task Force, 25th Infantry Division, distinguished itself by extraordinary heroism in ground combat against the Viet Cong in the Republic of Vietnam during the period January through April 1966. Ordered to secure a base of operations for itself and the remainder of the 25th Infantry Division in the vicinity of the town Tan An Hoi in the Cu Chi District of Vietnam, the Brigade Task Force embarked on 66 days of continuos combat operations in a completely Viet Cong dominated, heavily entrenched and fiercely defended area.

On January 1966, combat operations began to seize, clear and secure the area selected for a base of operations. For the initial four days, brigade combat elements moved forward against devastating automatic weapons and never-ending harrassing sniper fire, well established mine fields and vast underground systems of tunnels, trenches, spider holes and fortifications unrivaled in Vietnam. Displaying extraordinary heroism and unwavering determination, task force elements methodically cleared the area of a fanatical enemy force that was manning the fortifications.

This entire action was characterized by numerous acts of personnel sacrifice and heroism. During the period 30 January to 5 April, the Brigade conducted eleven major operations against the Viet Cong with battalion or larger sized forces engaged in fierce battle against a hostile enemy. On 5 April 1966, after 66 days of continuous combat, the Brigade had seized, cleared and secured the base of operations and surrounding area in the vicinity of Cu Chi, Republic of Vietnam. A total of 449 Viet Cong had been killed by body count. Viet Cong activities throughout the Cu Chi District were severely disrupted and the Viet Cong greatly discredited in the eyes of the local populace. During those momentous 66 days, the Brigade displayed utmost courage and indomitable spirit, and as a unit it demonstrated extraordinary heroism as it unwaveringly and unceasingly pitted itself against hard core, experienced, and entrenched and determined enemy forces.

The indomitable spirit and extraordinary heroism with which the 2nd Brigade Task Force engaged, battled and defeated a fortified and determined enemy during this period of continuos combat operations is in keeping with the finest tradition of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon all members of the Task Force who participated in the Battle for Cu Chi.

(Department of the Army, GO #20 25 April 1976) If you know anyone else that needs to be added to this list. Please Contact Dr. David N. Smeltz. E-Mail Pastor7777@aol.com Home page Pastor 7777 (HOME PAGE)


CMSGT WILLIAM L MADISON
U.S. AIR FORCE
MIA MAY 15, 1966

I NEVER KNEW WILLIAM L. MADISON OR HIS FAMILY. IN FACT THEY LIVE HALF WAY ACROSS THE COUNTRY FROM ME. I WILL PROBABLY NEVER MEET HIS FAMILY, YET I WEAR A BRACELET WITH HIS NAME ON IT. PEOPLE LOOK AT ME STRANGELY, AFTER ALL I AM A FIFTEEN YEAR OLD GIRL WHO WEARS A BRACELET WITH A MAN'S NAME ON IT WHOM I NEVER MET.

I WAS ONCE ASKED WHY I WEAR IT. I GUESS I WANT TO SHOW PEOPLE THAT THE WAR ISN'T OVER. NOT FOR THE PEOPLE WHO LOST FAMILY MEMBERS OR THOSE WHOSE FAMILY MEMBERS NEVER CAME HOME. I KNOW THIS IS A MEMORIAL PAGE, SO THIS MY MEMORIAL:

TO ALL THOSE WHO ARE STILL THERE OR WHO WERE FORGOTTEN BY THE MAJORITY OF SOCIETY, DO NOT GIVE UP HOPE BECAUSE IN A SMALL TOWN OF CALIFORNIA THERE IS A FIFTEEN YEAR OLD GIRL WHO WILL DO ANYTHING SHE CAN TO KEEP YOUR MEMORY ALIVE. TO ALL THOSE WHO DID NOT COME HOME YOUR MEMORY IS ALIVE AND I HOPE YOU REST IN PEACE

N. GREEN

Email Nicole Green


Sgt. John Leslie Roberts
RA16 953 836,
Trp A, 1st Sqdn, 1st Cav
Americal Division, Vietnam

Of seven Roberts children, no one ever thought the baby of our family would be in a war. I remember how excited he was...he received his papers for Vietnam on his 18th Birthday. He never even shaved a day of his life. He was only in Vietnam for three months...He assured us he was safe as he was a mechanic and worked on tanks.

All we know is that the tank he was in ran over a land mine. He "commenced tour in Vietnam 13 May 1968" and died July 6, 1968 "from wounds and burns received while passenger in military vehicle on combat operation when vehicle hit hostile mine."

We all miss him....

Candace Roberts Lauber


Earnest "John" Hendrickson, Jr.
125th Signal Battalion, 25th Inf.
1st Sqdn 9th Cav, troop A
1965-1968 Vietnam
"Dad, you will never be forgotten"

Over 20 years ago my father came home from Vietnam. Yet, he never really left. He spent countless hours alone. Reliving all the mistakes he believed he made. We loved him very much, but never truly understood why he lived his life, in a prison without walls. Its been 5 years now since his death. I regret not trying to learn about Vietnam when he was around.

I am desperatly trying to find anyone who may have may have known him. I have found pics and old newspapers and would love to share them with friends and family members who served between 1965-1968. I am looking for a close friend of his, Mark W. Click.

If you have any information , or feel I can help you, please email me

Summer538@aol.com


PFC Charles Steven Norris
May 31, 1948 - February 27, 1967
KIA-Quang Tri Province
2nd Platoon, Lima Co.

Only 18 in years, but much older in courage. He had been moved forward as pointman after his platoon leader and radioman were killed. This information was sent to his family by Jerry P. Akers, 2nd Lt., 2nd. Plt., "L" Co.: "As the entire company began to suffer casualities, we moved forward to the point of initial contact to get the wounded and dead. As we reached that point. . ., I ordered your son to move up a small jungle trail and check it out. Just as he began to move, he spotted an NVA, so stated, and was gunned down by the waiting NVA (who had an AK-47) as he brought up his own weapon. Your son died immediately and painlessly. He also died courageously, fighting to the end, a fitting sequal for fighting Marines."

I have missed my brother and thought of him everyday for 32 years.

"Rest in Peace, Steve."

Nancy Moore
djm5@zoomnet.net

Two poems Nancy wrote in honor of her brother Steve are in the "From the Heart" gallery


THIS POST IS DEDICATED TO JUST FOUR MEN OF THE 129TH ASSAULT HELICOPTER COMPANY.
BUT THE REST OF THE 58,000 PLUS HEROES,ARE IN MY HEART HERE TOO.
IN LOVING MEMORY OF THE CREW OF
THE "257"

KIA SEPTEMBER 12TH,1969 SOUTH VIET NAM

AC W2 STEPHEN ANTHONY DESANTIS
P W1 RICHARD AUTHOR SAWRAN
CE E4 LAWRENCE DAVID JACKSON
G E3 STEPHAN LEE HARGRAVE

A NIGHT IN THE LIFE, AND DEATH, OF FOUR HEROES.

THE FINAL MISSION OF THE "257". DESTINATION?......HEAVEN!

the original US ARMY Crash Summary of the "257".....with a few added words of my own!

ON THE NIGHT OF 12, SEPTEMBER, 1969, CRID DECLARED A TACTICAL-EMERGENCY AND AT APPROXIMATELY 2130 HOURS , THE "257", WAS LAUNCHED FROM LANE ARMY HELICOPTER PORT. THE CREW OF THE "257", ATTACHED TO THE 129TH ASSAULT HELICOPTER COMPANY, WAS NOT ADVISED OF THE WEATHER BY EITHER THE OPERATIONS OFFICER OF THE 129TH AHC OR LANE TOWER.

THE MISSION OF THE CREW WAS TO EXTRACT ONE VC/POW FROM THE 11TH COMPANY CAV. REGIMENT, AND FLY THE VC/POW TO REPUBLIC OF KOREAN HOSPITAL. ENROUTE THE CREW WAS TO PICK UP PERSONNEL FROM THE CRID TOC, WHICH THEY DID, AND THE CREW THEN REQUESTED, AND RECEIVED, PERMISSION TO FLY THROUGH THE PASS NORTHWEST OF LANE AHP. THE AIRCRAFT ARRIVED AT THE 11TH COMPANY AT APPROXIMATELY 2155 HOURS AND DEPARTED AT 2205 HOURS. THE CREW CONTACTED PHU CAT APPROACH CONTROL AND NOTIFIED THEM THAT THE AIRCRAFT HAD GONE INTO IFR CONDITIONS AND REQUESTED A RADAR VECTOR TO VFR CONDITIONS. THE PILOT REPORTED HIS ALTITUDE WAS 5,000 FEET AND REQUESTED A PRIORITY RADAR VECTOR FOR A GROUND CONTROL APPROACH INTO PHU CAT AIR FORCE BASE. THE PILOT REPORTED HIS POSITION AS OVER THE CHA RANG VALLEY OFF THE 170 RADIAL FROM PHU CAT AFB.

PHU CAT APPROACH CONTROL COULD NOT MAKE A POSITIVE IDENTIFICATION BUT HAD A SUSPECTED RADAR TARGET SEVEN MILES ON THE 170 RADIAL. THE AIRCRAFT COMMANDER REPORTED HE WAS ENCOUNTERING SEVERE TURBULENCE. AT 2212 HOURS PHU CAT CONTROL INSTRUCTED THE AC TO TURN INBOUND TO THE BEACON AND CLIMB TO 6000 FEET. THE PILOT ROGERED THE CONTROLLER'S INSTRUCTION. THIS WAS THE LAST COMMUNICATION BETWEEN THE AIRCRAFT AND THE GROUND. AFTER RADIO CONTACT WAS LOST, THE DUST OFF AND GUNSHIPS WERE LAUNCHED, HOWEVER, THE WEATHER CONDITIONS DID NOT PERMIT THE SEARCH AIRCRAFT TO ARRIVE AT THE SCENE UNTIL 0030 HOURS. ( then what the hell was the "257" doing out in that crap?....MJ )

THE "257" IMPACTED ON THE SIDE OF A MOUNTAIN AT 1990 FEET AND 125 FEET FROM THE CREST OF THE MOUNTAIN. THE WRECKAGE SUGGESTS THAT THE AIRCRAFT WAS IN A SLIGHTLY NOSE HIGH ATTITUDE AND WAS IN A SHALLOW RIGHT HAND TURN. THE AIRCRAFT'S LEFT SKID CONTACTED THE GROUND AND THERE WAS A BLADE STRIKE ON THE LEFT SIDE. THE RIGHT SKID HIT NEXT, AND THE AIRCRAFT WAS PITCHED FORWARD, AND UP THE HILL WHERE THE TRANSMISSION AND THE MAIN WRECKAGE REMAINED. THE ENGINE WAS TOSSED FURTHER UP THE HILL, AND THE TAIL BOOM SEPARATED FROM THE FUSELAGE AND CAME TO REST 75 FEET NORTH OF THE ENGINE. THE AIRCRAFT APPEARED TO HAVE BURNED DUE TO IMPACT. ALL ABOARD, GAVE THEIR LIFE, FOR THE COST OF FREEDOM.

TO WHOM EVER READS THIS, FOLKS....YOU WOULD NOT BE HERE IF THERE WASN'T A REASON. WE COME TO PLACES LIKE THIS ON THE NET TO REMEMBER. I KNOW, YOU WHO KNOW, KNOW WHAT I MEAN. WE HAVE BEEN CONTACTED BY OUR LOST SOULS TO CONTINUE THEIR LAST MISSIONS. YOU WHO POST HERE, CAN FEEL COMFORT IN KNOWING,THAT OUR LOST SOULS ARE SMILING DOWN UPON US.

I THANK THE STAFF OF THIS PAGE FOR THE TIME, AND SPACE. GOD BLESS YOU!!!! REST ASSURED THAT YOU ARE HELPING TO KEEP THE LOST SOULS SPIRIT'S ALIVE.

THE "NEW 257", TURNING INBOUND TO THE BEACON AND CLIMBING TO 6,000 FT.

LETS GO HOME LARRY!!!!

LAWRENCE ( LARRY ) DAVID JACKSON
GIVING THE "SIGN OF PEACE", TO ALL OF US.
I MISS YOU BROTHER!!!!

Contact Mark Jackson using this email form.


Carlos Hathcock
Gunnery Sergeant, USMC
Vietnam Veteran
Died: 22 February, 1999

Passing of a Marine Sniper

Gunnery Sergeant Carlos Hathcock USMC (ret) passed away Monday 22 Feb in Virginia Beach, VA.

He is best known for his duty as a sniper in the Marine Corps and being instrumental in starting the sniper training. His vast knowledge imparted while he served as an instructor and advisor contributed to the SEAL sniper training program. There will be a viewing at Woodlawn Thursday evening and interment on Friday.

Recently his son was promoted to Gunnery Sergeant in the Marine Corps and the promotion ceremony was moved to Virginia Beach to enable Carlos to pin the chevrons on.

"Gunny Hathcock" has been confined to a bed for sometime with multiple sclerosis, a crippling disease. He attended several of the SEAL reunions after being disabled from the dreaded condition because several of the SEALs would pick him up and return him home. Also, they (SEALs) kept check on his needs with constant visits and assistance. A return homage for the friendship and advice they received from the "Gunny."

May GOD take him to the land where suffering is no more.

The above tribute was distributed over the internet. The original author was not identified


Joseph D. Jarrell
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 14 February 1966

In memory of Joseph D. Jarrell, who was KIA on 2-14-66 while involved in Operation Double Eagle I, 2/4 Magnificent Bastards.

Anyone From 2/4, e-mail me at Roberta .

Some friends are looking.

Roberta


Gunnery Sergeant William Howard Norris
January 15, 1925 - July 11, 1997
USMC-Two tours of Vietnam, father of a Marine KIA in Vietnam
Veteran of Korean War
Died of Lung Cancer

Citation: "For meritorious achievement in aerial flight as a designated Airborne Radio Operator in Marine Aerial Refueler/Transport Squadron 152 during combat support missions in support of the Republic of Vietnam against the insurgent communist guerrilla forces (Viet Cong) from 19 May to 14 July 1965. GySgt. Norris contributed materially to the success of his squadron. His courage and devotion to duty in the face of hazardous flying conditions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service." Signed: V.H. Krulak, Lt.Gen., USMC, Commanding.

There were six letters like this in my Dad's personal effects that I found after his death. "I'm so proud of you, Dad. Rest in Peace."

Nancy Moore


Hershel Gay
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died 15 January 1997

Hershel Gay died of a heart attack Jan. 15th 1997. He was 52 years old. Hershel was from Vidor, Texas. He served with the 1st, Calvary Division from April 67-68.

He was an excellent soldier and a wonderful friend. Hershel, brother you are missed and you will be in our hearts like all the rest of our brothers from the vietnam era.

Billy White,
1st platoon 32nd Med.
44th Med. Brigade


Phillip J.Canty
US Navy
Vietnam Veteran
1949 - 1997

Phil died on Nov 1, 1997 of a brain aneurysm suffered while he was doing what he loved best....helping a friend. He grew up in Medford, Ma, and had lived in Arlington, Reading, and finally in Methuen, Ma, with his wife Patricia, at the time of his death.

Phil served with the 211th Fighter Squadron and did several tours in the waters off Vietnam. I believe it was aboard the USS Hancock..he talked about having been an airdale...something on the flight deck I believe. He also had some shore duty in Vietnam, but in exactly what capacity, I don't know.

We met when we were 21...both kids just home from VIetnam, and kind of trying to find our way in some trying times. A bond formed between the soldier and the sailor that has lasted, even through death. His sense of humor, which I admit I envied, turned him into everyones best friend.

He went on to have a career with the Raytheon Co. and raised a fine daughter, Andria. He was also know as the founder of The Dickhead Society, and its President Emeritus......our resident irreverent comedian who always dragged the rest of the gang,,,,Wheatie, Drew, Joe, Guido and myself..into the quagmire with him. I would once more like to hear him say to me, right after he said something outrageous to someone, "...isnt that right, Sully?"...and look for confirmation.

In memory of an average guy just trying to make his way.........our friend the Dickhead.

Mark Sullivan
mailto:Fdhy@AOL.Com


William A. Burr
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died 1984

My Brother was in the 101st. Airborne. His name is: William A. Burr. He committed suicide in 1984 by taking an overdose of sleeping pills and locking himself in his garage all night with the car running.

He volunteered for Vietnam in 1965 because mom had 10 kids in the house and our father had just passed away so he thought he could go to war and make money that way. He sent all his pay checks home to mom to feed the kids. He wanted to go to WMU in Kalamazoo Michigan and become a priest, I was a baby when he went to nam. I am his youngest sister and was very close to him. He was a very unselfish man. I am now 34 yrs old and attending WMU in Kalamazoo.

I just feel my brother needs to be seen for the hero that he truly was and not a "baby Killer" or whatever other nonsense that folks come up with.

Rae Immekus
REImmekus@beloit.com
rae.immekus@wmich.edu


Jerry Hogue Heizer
PFC, U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 6 September 1967

I would like to place a memorial in TAPS for Jerry Hogue Heizer. He was in the Marine Corps and was killed in action Wed Sept 6, 1967 in Quang Tin Province. He was 20 years old at the time of his death.

We graduated together from a small town in Virginia by the name of Staunton. I went into the Air Force and Jerry went in to the Marines. I think of him often as I have had a pretty good life with children and now grand children. I get so mad that he and all the rest didn't get the chances I have had.

I feel so bad about all the young men who gave their all over in Vietnam and no one cares. I just want to say thanks to all of them and they are not forgotten. I want Jerry to know he will never be forgotten as Long as I am alive.

JERRY YOU WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN

ROGER D DEDRICK
USAF 13889189


Joseph Byron Poe
1st Lieutenant, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 20 September, 1971

In Loving Memory of 1st Lt. Joseph Byron Poe KIA Sept. 20, 1971 in Long Khanh Province

Lt. Joe was a great platoon leader and loved by his men. He was a Arkansas Razorback through and through. On the day Joe was killed he was scheduled to return to the rear for stand down prior to PCS. His replacement flew out to the field and Lt. Joe told him to go back in he would stay with the platoon until the end of this last mission.

Two hours later as we moved out from resupply we were ambushed by members of the 33rd NVA Reg. Joe was killed instantly. He had been walking directly behind the point man. I was the senior company medic and I did my best for Joe but he had been hit in the face with an AK 47 and there was nothing I could do.

I just want Joe and his family to know that I think of him often and will never forget him. I don't mind saying I loved him...

I hope we will be together again some day...

Al Buskey (Doc)
Co B 2/5 Cav.
1st Air Cav. Div.
abuskey@nqks.com


Roger Dwayne Brooks
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
Died 31 January 1999

This tribute is for my brother Roger Dwayne Brooks who was a Marine & served in Vietnam. I'm not sure of his Unit all I know is that it was the 1st Marine Division.

I was just a little kid when he was in Vietnam but I remember well the day we picked him up at the airport coming home from their. Roger never talked about Vietnam & for years was very bitter. Its just been over the last couple of years that he came to terms with it.

My brother died Jan 31 1999 after a battling cancer for the last twenty years. We thought he was in remission but we found Oct of 1997 that he had liver cancer & it ended up going to his brain. He fought to the very end never giving up to the last time he closed his eyes. My brother was a true hero & was very proud of his Marine background. All I could do was cry when the Marines folded his flag & played taps for the last time.

All I can say is goodbye brother you were a beautiful person & a true hero.......

sherrie brooks parsons


MARION GILLINGHAM TRUESDALE
Colonel, USMC (ret.)
WW-II and Vietnam Veteran
Nov. 1919 - Feb. 1999

Col. Truesdale, veteran of WWII and Vietnam, the first Marine Corps lawyer and first Judge Advocate General of the Marine Corps, died in his sleep at the VAMC in Phoenix AZ at 0300 hours, 08 FEB 99. His wife, my mother, Kathryn was at his side. He leaves a rather large family behind, 3 daughters, Suzi Stone of San Diego CA, Jeanne Myers of Merit Island FL, and Julie Zerbe of Colorado Springs CO. Two sons, John of Paw Paw, WV and Rusty of Rockville, MD, seven grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

During his career with the U.S. Marine Corps (1940-1973) he served under the famous Col. "Chesty" Puller in the 1st Marine Division until he was wounded during the assault on Peleliu Island. He went back to the war during the taking of Okinawa and after war's end spent time in China trying to get the Japanese home before the Chinese killed them.

Returning home, Col. Truesdale did recuiting duties in Knoxville, TN and Boston, MA and Marine R.O.T.C. at Marquette University before being sent to law school for the Marines at Georgetown University, where he was first in his class of twenty Marines thus making him the first Marine Corps lawyer. In 1968 he became the first Judge Advocate General of the Marine Corps and spent a year in that position before going to Vietnam with the Third Amphip Div (Danang) from 1969 to 1970 where he was the circuit judge for the entire war zone. Col. Truesdale retired at Camp Pentleton in California in 1973 basically because as he told me, "I didn't have a snowballs chance in hell of making general."

I miss my dad already. This nation will feel the loss of an unsung hero. This man, my father, my hero.

From LZ Whatever in Paw Paw WV,

JayTee

Memorial services for Col. Truesdale, my father, will be at Pt. Loma Methodist Church in San Diego CA, Saturday, Feb. 20 at 1pm.

From LZ Whatever,


Ronald Gene De Weese
PFC, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Killed in Action: 14 November 1969

My Brother PFC Ronald Gene De Weese was KIA on November 14, 1969 and my family was told on my 11th birthday (Nov. 18, 1969). He was killed in the Province of Binh Dinh and died a HERO!! At least, a HERO to me.

Ronald was in the 4th Infantry Division and was only in Vietnam from August 29, 1969 to November 14, 1969, but had his 21st birthday there.

If anyone served with my brother, I would like to hear from you so I can know him better.

Dorothy Hoffman

My email address is dosie@alltel.net


In Honor of my Father
Michael Anthony Melluzzo, Jr.
from Hartford, CT
Buried in Arlington National Cemetary, VA.

My father, Michael Anthony Melluzzo, Jr., was from Hartford, CT. He fought in Vietnam for two years returning to marry my mother at about 21. My father could have been a wonderful man and to us he was, if he could only get past Vietnam and the treatment these brave man received upon return to the US.

On August 1, 1993,at the age of 45, my father gave into the war and; leaving behind 6 children and our mother. He is missed by everyone of us in so many different ways. I pray that he is able is to see us, as he now has three beautiful grandchildren. It breaks my heart to think of how our lives could have been, and how I know he wanted our lives to be like. It may have gotten harder for us to show it as we got older, but I love and miss my father more than anything; I'm only 21 and he has been dead for 5 years and it's not getting easier because so many new and exciting things are happening that he is missing. Our families are growing, but Dad I want you to know, no matter what, I think of you always, you will never be forgotten and even my three year old knows all about her POP. I love you, Dad, I feel your presence. Meet me at the gates of Heaven.

Until then,

Your Daughter,
Tertia Maria Melluzzo

If any one has any information about or knew my father I would love to hear from you, please write at mailto:ari710@yahoo.com


Capt. Michael Kevin Maloney, U. S. Army
Born March 20, 1945 -- Alton, IL
Raised in Springfield, IL
Died February 25, 1971 -- Vietnam

Mousey, we still miss ya and love you.

Mary Beth Maloney, Sister


John E. Scribner
1st Lt. USMC
Vietnam Veteran
Died January 7, 1969

1st Lt. John E. Scribner, Jr. , USMC, died January 7, l969 :

This is in honor of my father, who served 2 tours in Viet Nam, only to be succumbed to Agent Orange Related Illness at the age of 37 in Beaufort, South Carolina. He was a brave man, who insisted upon going to VietNam so his children "would never have to go".

He left behind 8 children and a loving wife, and I was the youngest at 18 months. I would appreciate anyone who knew of him, or spent time with him, contacting me at ajsj@bright.net. He received the Bronze Star posthumously, and according to my mother, lived for his Corps.

Sincerely yours,

Amy Scribner-Franzdorf,
West Unity, Ohio


Warren George Moore
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died 30 June 1989

My husband served in the Army in Vietnam 1968-1969. He fought this damn war for 20 years and finally gave in to it on June 30, 1989. He sat next to me on the bed and told me he could fight it no more, he had tried but could no longer fight and put a 38 Smith and Wesson to his right temple and took his own life.

Warren was from Brooklyn, New York.

He will be missed.

Deborah B. Moore 7607
Lone Oak Road Spartanburg, SC
29303.

My husband was Warren George Moore from Brooklyn, New York.
I would like to hear from friends of his who served with him.
My email is mailto:morkdmm@bellsouth.net



Ronald Gary Flaitz
vietnam veteran
Airforce
deceased since 1974

Ron was my half brother. I don't know very much about him because I was only 5 years old when he died. You see, he never could leave vietnam behind and in 1974 he took his own life,leaving behind a family with endless, unanswered questions.

I would like to get as much information as I can about all aspects of his life. If you served with him or knew him before his death. Please e- mail me at mollygriz@aol.com . Any information you can provide would be helpful. I would also like to get his military records if possible. I f anyone has any info on how I would do this please let me know. At the time of his death, he was living in dade county, Florida and all of his family was living in Hornell, N.Y. so we know very little about the circumstances surrounding his death. This is something that has haunted me all my life and I won't be able to feel peace until I find out more about him.

Anyone with any information please e-mail me as soon as possible.

Thank you,
Sally A. Law


Frank C. Ellingsworth
Vietnam Veteran
Died 4 September, 1998

My husband Frank C. Ellingsworth passed away on September 4, 1998. His death was caused by lung cancer due to Agent Orange exposure. At the time of his death he was rated 100% disabled through the Va.

Thank you

Bonnie Ellingsworth


Daniel Fravel
Vietnam Veteran

In Memory of Daniel Fravel, East Auroa, NY.

We were stationed together back in l961. I tried finding him for a few years and when I finally talked this lady,his mother, she said "you are a few years to late" he died of lung cancer. I don't know if it was agent orange or what all I know is he didn't smoke but only l cigarette in his life and I was a few years to late.

Karl Patterson


Kenneth Lloyd Small
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
1950-1969 July 7th

Loving son and brother , will never be forgotton always missed.

Rests in peace on a beautiful hill over looking the Salmon River Valley in Salmon , Idaho.

We love you

Mom ,Dad , Carey and Sherry


Lonnie Hughlan Harrison
PFC U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 10 June 1969

U.S. Army Hughlan went to Calhoun High School in Calhoun Ga . I am unsure of his graduation date and his induction into army.

He was my friend and co-worker and schoolmate. He was killed in Vietnam sometime in the late sixties. He was survived by a new wife , mother father, brothers, and sisters.

I look at your name and remember each time the wall is in my area.

Harry Charvat
USN RET.


Anthony (Bruce) J. Bruno
U.S. Navy
Vietnam Veteran
Korean War Veteran
WW-II Veteran

Please add my father, who died after the Vietnam war, from complications of Agent Orange.

IN MEMORY OF ANTHONY (BRUCE) J. BRUNO (aka TONY). DIED THANKSGIVING DAY, 1990.

Bruce, My father, was as patriotic as Americans can get. He was drawn into the Navy at the age of 18, in 1941, when WWII began. He served as a signalman on the Japanese held island of New Guinea. He made it through that war, and the Korean War. He served as a 4.0 sailor for his entire 32 year career.

He worked his way up to Chief (E-7) and just before his retirement, was sent by the Navy to Vietnam for two tours in the I Corps region of Vietnam. His hooch was at Dong Ha (on the DMZ). He served with MCB-5 (SeaBees) as a safety officer. He made rounds to all nearby bases and in doing so, passed under the constant spray of Agent Orange being applied by the "Ranch Hand" program.

When he finally came home, to retire from the navy, he began a long and painful remainder of his life, as his body literally fell apart from all sorts of strange chronic maladies.

During the winter of 1990, he and my mother drove, on vacation, to Casper, Wyoming. The first day of their stay, my father checked in to the Wyoming Regional Medical Center, complaining of shortness of breath. He rapidly plunged in to what appeared to be a systemic toxemia. He was given every test possible, and the Mayo Clinic and the Department for Disease Control were involved in every specimen taken from him. Now dependent on oxygen, my sister and I drove him home to California, where we took him first to the Local Regional Hospital, and then to UCLA Medical Center, where the finest doctors on the west coast could not find what was killing my father.

He was returned to our home town hospital, where he underwent more testing, to no avail. On the eve of Thanksgiving, 1990, we were told by his personal physician, that he would be dead within a day or two. We were told to make our peace with him. The last things he said were, "why me?" and "who will take care of mom?". We all sobbed.

After years of 'fighting' to get my father's name put on the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, I am still fighting (It is now January 1998), I have had no success. I am weary, as I have spent every extra ounce of my life, since my father (and best friend) died. But I can't give up. I know why he died. I know that his name on that wall means nothing to the Government, or probably to most Americans. But it is my life's goal, now. I served my time in-country, and my son just left the U.S. Marine Corps. I know of the pride of being a patriot. I will always love my country, as will all of my family.

My father gave his life for his country. He fought 3 wars and would have fought 3 more, if he had only lived. Bruce Bruno played in many bands, for the troops during his tours in Okinawa, the Philippines, Adak, and Vietnam. I hope someone remembers him.

God Bless America's Veterans.

Terry L. Bruno (XCTR2)


Frank Buero
BMCM, USCG
Vietnam Veteran

This is for Frank Buero BMCM USCG (ret)died Sep 18 1997.

He was a friends best friend. Frank will be missed by a lot of people. It wasn't a war that killed Frank,It was red lead paint that was a contributing factor to his death by killing his kidneys.

What bothers me is that the government wanted to cut off his medical coverage, even though he spent 26+ years on active duty. Thanks to people like Colan Powell, Franks medical was paid for. They cry for people to serve during a war but soon as it's over they forget.

We must stick together to survive. Thanks Frank for the memories

Stephen O'Barr & Family
CWO USCG (ret)


Tilton Dye
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran

My brother Tilton Dye died june 6 1996 of a heart attack. He served in veit-nam in 1964 as a medic and gunner on a huey. I will miss my brother. He understood me in my problems

I spent 21 years in the military with a tour in viet nam at camp carrol on the dmz .I loved my brother

andy dye
Retired army


Walter Alan Cichon
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
POW/MIA

I`m Jeunesse and I live in The Netherlands.

I know Im Dutch and only 31 but Ive always had a special place in my heart for all those Vets whove been through so much.They all gave themselfs to the world and the world never acknowledged them.

Because of that I adopted a POW/MIA named Walter Alan Cichon(UsArmy).Im making a special place for him on my homepage to honour him and to take a stand.I also want all the Vets and family and friends of the Vets to know that I wrote a poem for all of you.

This is for all that didnt come back and were KIA.

Heaven,

Now that the mourning commotion around you has died down
the procession has passed by
the shuffling feet
Now I feel the deep silence coming
and in that silence
I shall meet you again
Ever so often I will come across you
too soon we say:....Its over.....
God only took away your body
not who you were
and what you said
Your soul will be with us forever
Together well walk
talking
through the silent landscape
Now that my hands cant touch you no more..........
You touch my heart even clearer.

Jeunesse(Chez)
my email
my web page
icq=19914626


George A. Kunkemoller
Sgt. U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran

George A. Kunkemoeller sgt. U.S. ARMY , died April 5, 1997 of a sudden heart attack at home. He just had past his 20 year mark with the Army one week earlier. HE WAS ACTIVE IN THE INDIANA NATIONAL GUARD.

HE SERVED IN THE VIET NAM WAR . HE SERVED TWO TOURS IN THE WAR. HE RECENTLY WAS ON SECURITY WITH THE NATIONAL GUARD AT THE OLYMPICS IN ATLANTA. HE WAS IN ARMY INTELLIGENCE IN THE WAR. MORSE INTERCEPT. HE WORKED WITH YOUNG KIDS TO GET THEM OFF DRUGS. HE WAS MARRIED 19 YEARS TO SUE, AND 4 WONDERFUL GIRLS. INCLUDING A SET OF TWINS... HE IS SADLY MISSED BY ALL. HE TRULY WAS A GREAT MAN AND FRIEND, FATHER,AND HUSBAND.........

A FRIEND


David Finnell
MGySgt USMC (Ret.)
Died Jan 8 1999

MGySgt Dave Finnell, a survivor of "Howard's Hill" RVN 1966, died suddenly of heart related problems. Dave was a much decorated veteran of multiple tours in Viet Nam, a good family man and a true American Hero.

His passing has caused great sadness in the hearts of those who knew him.

a friend

Sent in by Butch Corcoran


Martin T. Prast
U.S. Army Special Forces
Vietnam Veteran
Died 21 January 1998

Martin T. Prast of Grand Island, NY died on January 21,1998 at the VA medical Center in Buffalo, NY. Martin was Special Forces in Vietnam when the Tank he was riding on hit a mine. He was medevaced to the USS Repose for surgery and he was a paraplegic after surgery. He lived a good life and was loved by all who knew him.

On Memorial Day at the Wall; May 25,1998 his name was added to the wall along with Charles L. Vanover; Herman J. Vollmer; Vernon L. Ostertag; and Robert M. Swick. Martin now resides with his brothers at Panel 8 West, Line 81.

Respectfully Submitted,

Paul A. Angrisano
Chief Service Rep.
VVA New York State Council


Maj. DONALD E. SHAY JR.
U.S. Air Force
MIA

Major Shay was shot down over Laos. I did not know him but I wore his MIA Bracelet for 18 years, until I found his name on the Wall.

He gave his life for his country and he will never be forgotten by his loved ones or by me.

In peace this holiday season.

Cindy Hewlett


Pfc.George G. Kilbuck,
From: Bethel,AK,
D.O.B 08/20/43,
K.I.A.:08/27/65-Friday

George was killed 7-days after his 22nd birthday in South Vietnam, We were in Co a 2nd Bn 502 inf.101st Abn Div.

I ask forgiveness from his family, friends and all those that loved him as I did, for my lapse of honor to our vows to each other should I be a survivor and he was not.

I still have his wings (Blood?) and would like to keep our promise, and give his wings to the next of kin, as promised.

My wings were with him at the time of his death. I am so sorry it took me 33 years to face up to my responsiblility and turn them over to his family and love ones.

I am deeply sorry, please forgive me. He has never been out of my thoughts, prayers, dreams or life over these 33 tormented years.

I was finally able to get some help on August 08, 1994 for PTSD as a result of his death and other events shortly therafter his death (most of you Viet-Vets under- stand) at our fine MVAMC here in Miami, as well numerous outreach centers, just waiting to help us,help ourselves and our families.

I can't express enough how grateful me and my family are for their intervention and saving me from myself and my grief, which had become more than I could bear at times.

I would like to see more Viet-Vets help themselves and their families in particular (they suffer the most I think, because they feel helpless and powerless when they see us suffering and not getting help) because there is help and hope and very dedicated people, well trained, well equipped, and waiting to help, if we would help ourselves first.

We as Viet-Vets have to take that first step on that "Last Patrol" know one else can do it for us, only us.

So if not for yourself, then do it for all the "GG's" on the WALL and your suffering families, they suffer with you also, even more so I think.

Humbly asking for forgiveness

Sincerely ,

Pfc James D. Sims
Co a 2nd Bn 502 Inf. 101st Abn. Div.
South Vietnam July 20th-September 27, 1965?


Herman Lee Lawson
Vietnam Veteran
Died 23 December 1997

My brother, Herman Lee Lawson, a very loving and generous man died December 23, 1997. He served his country proud and we his family are very proud of him. We love and miss him terribly. My brother (Joe as he was called) had been ill for several years. All during this time he had a strength that was felt by all who knew him.

I love you my big brother and will keep you in my heart always.

Ruthie Lawson, sister


Sgt. Lester A. Wilson, Jr.
4/24/43 - 12/10/84
US Army
In Vietnam from 3/67 to 4/68

My father died after a 2 year battle with cancer on December 10, 1984. His death was not declared service connected by the government until 1991. He died of colon cancer as a result of his exposure to Agent Orange. He was only 41 years old. He left behind myself, my brother (13 and 12 at the time), and a half-brother (2 yrs old at the time) from his marriage 2 years before he passed on.

14 years later, I'm still trying to come to terms with his death and find closure. After his funeral, my mother cut my brother and I off from his side of the family for her own selfish reasons. It wasn't until 2 years ago that I finally reunited with them. It was very helpful hearing stories about my father that I never heard before. There are still many unanswered questions I have about him.

He served in the Army in the HHB Div Arty 9th Inf Div USARPAC, in and around the Saigon Area from 3/67 - 4/68.

He never spoke of his tour of duty - not even to my mother or his family. He has a collection of slides he took while in Vietnam - showed them to me when I was 12... mostly his buddies and rice paddies. I don't know why he showed them to us, but he didn't say much when projecting them onto the screen.

As I get older, my childhood memories of him grow dimmer and dimmer. I hope that someone out there knew him and can share something about him with me. My e-mail address is: mailto:nessman@servtech.com

I know now that he's in a better place now.

Les Wilson


Robert A. Layton
2LT, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 3 July 1969

Robert A. Layton, 2LT, died in combat 3 July 1969. Awarded the Silver Star and Bronze Medal. This is for all my brothers who died there:

For what is it to die but to stand naked in the wind and to melt into the sun?

And what is it to cease breathing but to free the breath from its restless tides, that it may rise and expand and seek God unencumbered?

Only when you drink from the river of silence shall you indeed sing

And when you have reached the mountain top, then you shall begin to climb

And when the earth shall claim your limbs, then shall you truly dance

Arthur Layton


Richard Duane Walker
LtCol U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 14 June 1969

Richard Duane Walker ltc, KIA 14 June 1969, 547th combat Eng.

Does anyone know him or can you provide me with any information on this units history.

send any info to dmw1@totcon.com

David or Charles Walker


Edward Maurice Welch
U.S. Air Force
Master Sergeant
Died December 11th, 1998

For my daddy

He was a wonderful father and a great husband.. For many years my father suffered from Lung Cancer related from Agent Orange. He is proceeded in death by his oldest brother Rich (who was also in the Vietnam War, and his oldest daughter Danielle who died June 17th,1997.He leaves behind his wife Madeline, his daughter Denise and his son-in-law Anthony.

We love you daddy and we will see you when are time is up. Meet us at the gates to Heaven...

Love,
your family forever

Denise


KENNETH E. BAKER
A1C, U.S. Air Force
Vietnam Veteran
His name is listed on the wall.

I have always wished that I could communicate to his friend s and relatives the heroic manner in which he died in action. He enlisted at La Porte, Texas and was killed in a communist attack on Binh Thuy in the spring of 1968.

Ken and I served together at Binh Thuy over the Great Tet Offensive.

I have written a book containing considerable material relating to my Viet Nam experiences, including a truthful description of the heroic manner in which Kenneth gave his life in battle.

Charles James Hall
Viet Nam Vet
in country: may 02, 1967 to may 04 1968
survived more than 35 separate communist attacks.


Richard George Sims, Sr.
United States Army SP 5
25th Infantry Division
Cu Chi
Vietnam Veteran (deceased)

I don't know alot about my dad when he was in the service. All I know is that he was a door gunner with the 25th Infantry Divison "Diamond Heads at Cu chi" in the Vietnam Conflict. He was also stationed at Fort Lewis and Fort Ord. If anyone can help me find out any information, it would be greatly appreciated.

I miss him very much. He was a loving husband to my mom and a wonderful father to all of us kids.

thank you,
Tammy Haines-Sims

Email to Tammy if you can give her any information about her dad


Johnny Cruz
and other California Vietnam Veterans
from a ceremony conducted at the
California Vietnam Veterans Memorial
on Veterans Day 1998

Sent in by his friend Steve Rivera


Thomas A. Schafer
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran

My father was a Marine in Vietnam. I am his only child and will always love him dearly. My father, Thomas A. Schafer, was severely injured in Vietnam and was returned home. He never forgot his time there and was haunted often. He was killed about 5 years later ,when I was two years old, from a drunken driver. I wanted to know what he was like. I wanted to hug and love him. My father was that drunken driver, he killed himself. He never could forget. Neither will I.

His forgiving and loving daughter, Stacie.


James D. Purcell, Jr.
Vietnam Veteran
Well Loved

James D. Purcell Jr. passed away on July 14, 1994 just 10 days shy of his 44th birthday. He succumbed to cancer caused by Agent Orange. He is survived by his wife Janice, a son Jarrett, 2 stepdaughters, Julie and Rebecca and 2 grandchildren.

Jim, In our hearts you will always be....never will we forget you.

Love Always....
Janice & Jarrett
Julie, Ashley & Andrew
Rebecca


Kenneth Jones
U.S. Air Force
Vietnam Veteran
Korea War Veteran
WWII Veteran
April 19, 1923 - December 10, 1998

Kenneth Jones served in WWII, Vietnam, and the Korean War. He served his veterans faithfully for years before he passed away due to a long battle with cancer.

Kenneth was in the Air force. He was also a POW in WWII and Vietnam. He was held a year and a half durring WWII and a few months in Vietnam.

He was a very important man in his community as well as those of us who he touched our lives. He will be missed by all!

Thank you very much

- Cynthia Danziger -


SFC Vernal D. Whiteside, Retired
Born November 11, 1932
Died December 25, 1997
Served in VietNam 1970

SFC Whiteside was my husband of 40 years. He began his Army career in 1952 and served in Korea as well as Viet Nam.

Barbara Whiteside


DAVID L. BLANCHETTE
U. S. Army
Vietnam War Veteran
JUNE 25TH 1950----APRIL 29TH 1996

David L. Blanchette, a devoted father, husband, brother, son in law & friend. He was the last of the "good guys" as he was once described. My dad was drafted into the Vietnam War at the age of 18. He wasn't one that was killed during the war but about twenty years later, from a war related illness. CANCER, the cause that we, the family were told was AGENT ORANGE.

I am sure many, many of the war veterans and their families know this road too well. I miss my dad more each day! He is survived by his wife Mary, his 23 year old son , John David & myself, Tracy Marie 20 years old. We miss you dad more than we could say, thank you for all the great memories!!!! Rest in Peace until we see you again!!!!

Thank you for your time & you and your families are in our thoughts and prayers!

Take Care,

Tracy Marie Blanchette ( David L. Blanchette's daughter)
BLANCH7324@aol.com


Harold James Hunnicutt, Jr
U.S. Army Veteran of the Vietnam War
Casper Platoon - 173rd Airborne Brigade

I regret to inform you of the passing of another veteran. Each day or ranks thin. Stand up and be counted or be forgotten.

Jim, as he was know to his family, was killed in a one car accident in Idaho on September 25, 1998. He was a tough little shit bird who had survived many auto accidents and motorcycle wrecks in the past - I guess we always figured he was too mean to die.

Jim, who was also known as "Redwood City Shorty", was essentially told to join the military or go to jail. He choose the Army 'cause they could take him right away. After basic he went to paratrooper school. He was the first to leave the plan, but the last to hit the ground. He was little, but he was tough - many a bigger man mad the mistake of thinking they could whip his little butt.

Jim was assigned to Casper Platoon of the 173rd Airborne in either late 70 or early 71. He was a helicopter maintenance worker, who also flew as a gunner. He was flying as a gunner one day when the helicopter he was riding on was shot down. Jim was wounded in that action. We would joke about him getting the "I forgot to duck badge", but he was proud of his service in Vietnam.

He and the Army did not get along very well and parted ways as quickly as possible. Jim came home and tried to become a civilian. He had a hard time adjusting. He was trained to be an auto body man - and he was a darn good one, but he had a hard time keeping a job. Sooner or later someone would say something to him and then Jim would end up quitting or being fired.

Jim had a lot of trouble with PTSD. For years we had been trying to get him to get treatment, but he wanted nothing to do with the VA. Finally, in the Spring of 1998, Jim applied and was accepted at the American Lake Veterans Hospital near Tacoma, Washington. He finished the program in mid August and was awarded a 60% disability. He was still waiting on his first check when he was killed.

Jim is survived by two sons, James and P.J and by a daughter Annette.

I miss you bro' . We were the only ones who could really understand what the other was talking about. WELCOME HOME.

Your cousin,

Bobby McBride
Crewchief
128th Assault Helicopter Company
Phu Loi, Vietnam 69-70


In memory of my Friends and Fellow Crewmembers
who were killed in action in the Republic of Vietnam.

WO1 OSCAR MAYER III KIA 060469
WO1 JOSEPH ZAPPINI KIA 060469
SP4 PATRICK FINCH KIA 060469
SP5 MICHAEL TURNER KIA 060469
CPT GREGORY ENGEL KIA 072469
PFC JAMES CARMAN KIA 020170
SP4 LEE LESHEN KIA 020870
SP5 MICHAEL MERENO KIA 020870
CW2 WILLIAM PISHNER JR. KIA 031070
WO1 LEONARD CUNNINGHAM KIA 031270
WO1 JAY DANDURAND KIA 031270
SP4 GARY McNICHOL KIA 031270

And especially for my Gunner:
SP4 CHARLES CUMMINGS KIA 031270

REST IN PEACE MY FRIENDS

Bobby McBride - Puyallup, WA
Crewchief 128th AHC 69 - 70


Martin Carranza
Lance Corporal, USMC
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 25 May 1967

u.s.m.c. died chulai vietnam june 1967

my good friend your shadow is with me all the days and nites of my life

i am used to you being there now after 30 yrs may god smile on your face forever as i shall some day

I miss you Martin Carranza

from his friend Bill Reed


Richard William Scoby
SSG, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 23 December 1970

SSG Richard William Scoby, KIA 12/23/70 in Tay Ninh Province by Nui Ba Den mountain.

this poem I write for you, Daddy.....

"Someday"

Someday, Daddy,
I will be able to finally
Hold your hand....

Someday, Daddy,
I will be able to see you
In that Heaven land...

Someday, Daddy,
We will walk among the clouds...
Together.....


Lawrence Orsborn, Sr.
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died October, 1998

Lawrence Orsborn Sr. passed away in Oct 98 after suffering withe several illnesses all recognized by the V.A. as Agent Orange related. He leaves behind His wife Sandy and His son Lawrence Jr. daughter-in-law Amy three grandchildren Kayla, Jessica, and Dustin.

I too am a veteran of Viet Nam, and I shared many hours with Larry in the few short years I knew him, and this man was truly an American Hero. He started his Military career serving four years in the Army including a tour in Viet Nam and then served another 18 years as a Navy CB. His military career ended with a medical retirement.

In 1985 He started going downhill and finally was laid to rest in 1998. He was preceded in death by his infant daughter Christine also an Agent Orange casualty and a younger brother.

He was an American, a Husband, Father, Grandfather, and Friend in ways that few men can ever accomplish. We Miss You Old Man. May this deployment end your suffering and give you everlasting peace.

From his friend


Herman Lee Lawson
Vietnam Veteran
Died 23 December 1997

My brother, Herman Lee Lawson, a very loving and generous man died December 23, 1997. He served his country proud and we his family are very proud of him. We love and miss him terribly. My brother (Joe as he was called) had been ill for several years. All during this time he had a strength that was felt by all who knew him.

I love you my big brother and will keep you in my heart always.

Ruthie Lawson, sister


LCPL KARL FOSTER
U.S. MARINE CORPS
VIET NAM
Died 1/26 1970

MY BROTHER KARL FOSTER MADE IT HOME AND WAS KILLED BY A DRUNK DRIVER A FEW WEEKS AFTER DISCHARGE. ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO

His Sister,
Martha Foster


Steve Craig English
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 12 February, 1971

IN REMEMBRANCE OF STEVE ENGLISH, K. I. A. FEB 12.1971 ON THE ROCKPILE DURING LAMSON 719.

JUNGLE JANE AS STEVE WAS KNOWN WAS A GRUNT'S GRUNT AND I'M NOT ASHAMED TO SAY I LOVED HIM DEARLY.

BRO. ITS BEEN MANY YEARS... TOO MANY SINCE WE LAUGHED AND JOKED, DREAMED OF THE WORLD. JUNGLE JANE (HE WAS PROUD OF THAT NAME) HE WAS TIGHT AS A DRUM IN THE JUNGLE LIKE HE WAS BORN THERE AND HIS GIRLS NAME WAS JANE HENCE THE NAME STUCK.

I MISS YOU. THE TIMES WE HAD TOGETHER AND THE DANGER WE SHARED. JANE WAS FROM WASHINGTON STATE. YOU HAVE A LOT TO BE PROUD OF IN THIS MAN. I AM BRO. I NEEDED TO SHARE THIS TIME WITH YOU.

Sent in by his friend RUSSELL DOC MORSE
ACO 4TH 3RD 11TH L. I. B.
AMERICAL 70-71


Ruben Dwight Reese
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 5 December 1969

Larry Reese's brother,Ruben, was killed in Vietnam. I am also A Vietnam Veteran and Larry's brother was close to my wife's brothers. Larry was also over in Vietnam and also a close friend of the family. Larry was so troubled by the loss of his brother. To this day I have been unable to talk to the family, but our family would like to know if larry's brother is properly listed on the wall. Since I myself was heading over to vietnam and on my return went to Steward AFB New York. If I am not mistaken his mother passed away.

I was also close to Larry Reese and it has been hard to talk to him since his brother died. Larry was A Marine and I think that his brother was too.

Submitted by his friend, Willis.


John J. Turner
U.S. Marine Corps
Korean War Veteran
Purple Heart

John J. Turner of Lowell was active in veterans' affairs

John J. Turner, 65, died Tuesday, Oct. 27, at the Jamaica Plains Veterans Administration Hospital in Boston. He was buried with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetary

He was the husband of Sheila Turner.

He was born in Lowell, on Aug. 15, 1933, a son of the late Ernest and Margaret (McShane) Turner. He received his early education in Lowell schools. In 1949, Mr. Turner competed in The Lowell Sun Charities Golden Gloves in the 147-pound class, being stopped only by Norman Hayes.

At the outbreak of the Korean War, he enlisted in the Marine Corps at age 17. He served from August 1953 until his honorable discharge on Aug. 18, 1955. He was awarded the Purple Heart for having been wounded in action in Korea, as well as the Korean Service Medal, U.N. Service Medal, Korean PUC and National Defense Service Medal.

He returned to Lowell in August 1955 and worked as a painting contractor for several years, prior to purchasing the Farragut Hotel, which was the start of "JJ's Pub," a Lowell institution that had a reputation of providing meals and care to any veteran visiting Lowell.

He was a member of many veterans organizations, including the Marine Corps League, which he helped to form and had sponsored many Marine Corps Birthday Parties at the Pub; the Military Order of the Purple Heart; and the Walker Rogers Post of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, where he was a life member.

Mr. Turner was known to donate considerable time and money to Lowell veterans functions, and had raised funds for the "Moving Wall" as well as the Desert Storm support. Mr. Turner also supported the Challenge Unlimited program at Iron Stone Farm, a therapeutic riding program for the mentally challenged.

Besides his wife, he is survived by a daughter, Amy J. Turner of Lowell; two brothers, Edward D. Turner of Lowell, and Robert F. Turner of Billerica; and three sisters, Margaret Hunter of Bellport, N.Y., Ruth Drapel of East Patchogue, N.Y., and Jane Hololob of Yaphank, N.Y.John J. Turner


JOSEPH DAYTON WEAVER, U.S. ARMY
VIETNAM VETERAN
PASSED AWAY ON 25 NOVEMBER 1998

JOSEPH DAYTON WEAVER, A VIETNAM VET. DIED NOV.25TH

MY HUSBAND WAS A FIGHTER INTO THE VERY END. HEJOINED THE ARMY WHEN HE WAS 17 AND WAS PARALYZED WHEN STRUCK BY GUNFIRE INVIETNAM. HE WAS IN THE 1ST. CALVARY DIV.AND THE 82nd AIRBORNE.. HIS MILITARYAWARDS WERE THE PARACHUTIST BADGE, EXPEDITIONARY MEDAL, AND 3 PURPLE HEARTS.

EVEN THOUGH JOE HAD TO USE A WHEELCHAIR, IT DID NOT STOP HIM. HE DIDEVERYTHING BUT WALK. JOE HUNTED, HE SWAM, AND WHAT MANY WILL REMEMBER BEST ISPHOTOGRAPHY. JOE LOVED TAKEN PICTURES OF THE OUT DOORS. WHEN LOOKING AT HISWORK YOU FELT LIKE YOU WERE THERE. JOE WON MANY AWARDS FOR HIS WORK, HE NEVERSOLD MANY OF HIS PICTURES, HE WOULD GIVE THEM AWAY. HE ONCE SENT ONE TO JIMMYCARTER, WHO SENT HIM A LETTER OF THANKS. HE ALSO HAD A PICTURE HANGING IN THEROTUNDA IN WASHINGTON. IT WAS OUR PLEASURE TO MEET WITH JEAN KENNEDY SMITH,MR. AND MRS. DOWINSKI [THE HEAD OF VET. AFFAIRS AT THAT TIME] AND THE MANYOTHERS AT THE SIGNING OF THE JOINING OF THE VERY SPECIAL ARTS AND THE VETSART.

JOE NEVER LET THE WHEELCHAIR HOLD HIM BACK. WHEN I MET HIM IN 1983, INEVER SAW THE WHEELCHAIR, I SAW A BIG WONDERFUL SMILE AND BRIGHT EYES. WE WERE MARRIED IN 1984. JOE TAUGHT MANY HOW TO BE STRENGTH AND TO GO ON NO MATTER WHAT. JOE HAS LEFT BEHIND A GRANDAUGHTER,WHO NOW I WILL BE RAISING ALONE.

I HAVE BEEN TRULY BLESSED TO HAVE BEEN A PART OF JOSEPH `S LIFE. OUR SOLDER FOUGHT A GOOD FIGHT, BUT THE CANCER TOOK HIS BODY.BUT NOT HIS LIFE ,FOR I KNOW MY HUSBAND IS IN HEAVEN RUNNING THE STREETS OF GOLD. JOSEPH WEAVER I WILL ALWAYS LOVE YOU AND THANK YOU FOR BEING YOU,

BRENDA WEAVER


Roger Sonntag, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran

My Uncle Roger Sonntag was in Company C, 1st Battalion, armor division in Vietnam the year 1970. He was later killed in a car wreck in 1978 in California. He is buried at the Memorial Lawn Cemetary in Parsons Kansas.

Provided by Dawn Bump


Rory Jay Johnson
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died June 10, 1995

My brother-in-law Rory Jay Johnson, a Navajo Indian from New Mexico, passedaway on June 10, 1995, from lung and kidney cancer, possibly associatedwith his exposure to agent orange while in Vietnam.

I don't know when Roryjoined the Army, however, he served his country well. He suffered fromPTSD, but had a loving wife and children that supported him to the end.Rory left behind his wife (who, ironically, died 8 months later), 2 sonsand a daughter.

Rory's children miss him very much.

Submitted by: IdaBradley


LAWRENCE NEIL SAVINO
VIETNAM VETERAN
NORTHAMPTON, MA
Died in Vietnam in May 1969

I was only 5 years old when my brother, Larry, was killed. However, I canstill vividly remember being at home and seeing a man in a uniform walkingtoward the front door of our house. I remember the screams and cries of mymother when he gave her the awful news. I can remember my Dad coming homeafter he had been told while at work. I really miss Larry, and I often wonderwhat he would be doing today; would he be a successful businessman, self-employed, a police officer, a mechanic,..... Would he be married, divorced,have children,...

I've been to The Wall several times. Each time, I become more and moreemotional. So many lives............................... Here in Northampton,MA, there is a war memorial, too. My brother's name is on that, as well. Inow have my brother's flag, as well as all the medals he received whileserving his country in Vietnam. I have them proudly displayed in my home.

Brother, I miss you and love you.

Scott A. Savino
Northampton, MA
vino89@aol.com


Sergeant Michael A. Sager
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
Died April 16, 1997

Michael A. Sager, service number2533 US Marine Corp Sgt E5 washonorably discharged. He served in Vietnam 700626-710517 and was from SaginawMichigan.

Mike died April 16, 1997 from Agent Orange, lung cancer. He was aHonorable man, a loving husband, father, grandfather, brother and son. Hewas proud to have served his country and very proud to have been a Marine.He also thought that the war was behind him, not knowing that he carried withhim an illness that would take his life at 47, His prime of life. Ourchildren were finally grown and we were going to be able to spend somewonderful times together , had made many plans that we both looked forwordto.

Then our lives were shattered. We had a love that only few people canclaim, we shared everything together, He was the most considerate andloving person many of our acquaintances have ever met. We were viewed as theperfect couple and we were. It has been a year and a half, and still I can'tgo on without loving him. Even though the VA has recoginized him as havingAgent Orange they say that his name will not be memorialized as with the WarHeros who have their names on the Vietnam Wall.

Mrs. Michael A. Sager (Dottie)

ps I will always be Mrs. Michael A. Sager Proudly


Junior Sells
Vietnam Veteran and Grandfather
Died: April 14 1994

Junior sells Died on April 14,1994

I am his 13 yr. old grandson and i am trying to find some info. onhim. he was my best freind and i miss him dearly. I have never metanyone like him. if you have any inf. please e-mail me at:

sells7@mail.microserve.net

thank you

" grandpa i love you"


SGT/MAJ RICHARD ALLAN SCHAAF
US ARMY
VIETNAM VETERAN
KIA: 080866
SOUTH VIETNAM

DICK BELIEVED WE SHOULD HAVE BEEN THERE. HE DIED DOING WHAT HE BELIEVED IN. "GREATER LOVE HAS NO MAN THAN THIS. THAT HE GIVE UP HIS LIFE FOR HIS FRIENDS ".

From a friend

S/MAJ RICHARD ALLAN SCHAAF
COMPANY "A" 1ST BATTALION
7TH CAVALRY
BORN 30 DEC 29 DIED 08 AUG 66

RICHARD WAS KILLED DURING OPERATION PAUL REVERE II AT LZ JULIETT AS A MEMBER OF COMPANY" A " 1ST BATTALION 7TH CAVALRY ON 08 AUG 66 WHILE COVERNING A WITHDRAWL OF TROOPERS DURING THE EARLY PART OF THE BATTLE NEAR CHU PONG MASSIF.

HE WAS A "LIFER" WHO BELIEVED IN HIS COUNTRY AND FELT WE SHOULD HAVE BEEN IN VIETNAM. HE IS LOVED AND MISSED TO THIS DAY. HE IS WITH GOD AND I'LL SEE HIM AGAIN . HE WAS MY COUSIN AND MY FRIEND.

RON


DENNIS D. TROUTEN
SSgt. USAF
Vietnam Veteran
July 8, 1947 - November 12, 1994

I lost my husband at the age of 47 to Metastatic Malignant Melonoma causedby exposure to Agent Orange while serving in Vietnam in the late sixties.He left behind three sons and a five month old granddaughter that he saw forthe first time the evening before he passed away. He now has fourgrandchildren. I will be sure that they know their grandfather.

Denny loved his country and the freedoms we enjoy in this great UnitedStates. He never spoke about Vietnam until shortly before he died. He toldme he thought he had survived Vietnam only to find that the war killed him.

He was so much a part of my life for 22 years that I can still feel him withme. Though he is gone, my love for him lives on and will till I leave thisearth. I will see him again in heaven.

Dorothy Trouten


Roy P. Benavidez, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Medal of Honor

Roy Benavidez passed away in San Antonio Texas on Sunday, 29 November. He was 63.

He was awarded the Medal of Honor in 1981 for actions in Cambodia in May of 1968. Here is a link to his MOH Citation.

------------------------------The following information was provided by George Carrasco

On Tuesday in El Campo, TX (Roy's home), just outside Houston, Roy willbe in the church where he and his children were married. There will bean honor guard from the Alamo Silver Wings Airborne Assn. (ASWAA)accompanying the hero.

On Wednesday, Roy will lie in state at Porter-Loring Mortuary in SanAntonio from 8a - 5p, and there will be a Rosary for him at 7pm.

On Thursday at 1000am there will be a mass in San Antonio's San FernandoCathedral and then to Fort Sam Houston's National Cemetary for burialwith full military honors.


Matthew P. Moran USMC
Vietnam Veteran
HMM-364

Matthew P. Moran, Marine, Vietnam Veteran. Died from Cancer 10/98 (fourth time he'd fought it, three times he'd won). Matt was with HMM-364 in Danang, SVN '64. He was Marine, a guitar playing fool, and a good family man with three daughters, one who is joining the Marines 1/99.

He was my friend, and my Bro. Now there's one less person that I can talk to who understands, and I miss him.

T. Hayes - Phu Bai - '65-'66


Charles Searles USMC
Vietnam Veteran
KIA July 4, 1968

We were supposed to rotate together on July 19, but he was killed during an ambush. Out of all my friends who died, his death still haunts me today. He was from Burbank, California. Years later, I tried to contact his family, but could not find them because they moved East.

There isn't a day that goes by when I don't think of him, and in that sense he will live on.

Semper Fi.

Dennis Latham


Jack Meyer Siegel
Corpsman, USN
Vietnam Veteran

My name is Elissa-Maxine Cohen. I am 28 years old and live in Queens NY. Myfather, Jack Meyer Siegel, passed away August 12, 1998. He lived in PompanoBeach, Florida. On August 19th, he was laid to rest at Arlington NationalCemetary. This was what my dad wanted.

I remember the day when he called me totell me that he was finally accepted. He was soooooo happy. Although i toldhim that he still had time here with me and my brother David. It was difficultwhen I received the news. My brother called me at 4:30am and I could not makeit down to Florida until 11pm at night. It was a very long day for me. Thepast 3 months have been extremely difficult. There is not a moment that goesby that I dont think about my Dad. He was a great.

My dad was enlisted in the US Navy from 1/25/66 - 12/15/69.
He was at Recruit Training in Great Lakes, IL from 1/26/66 - 4/8/66.
Hospital Corps School in Great Lakes, IL from 1/26/66 - 4/8/66.
US Nav Hosp in St. Albans NY (Ward Corpsman) from 8/11/66 - 3/30/67.
Fld Medical School, Camp Pen Calif Marine Corps Bas from 4/19/67 - 5/23/67

VIETNAM 6/5/67 - 5/23/68
H&S co 1st Bn 4th Marines RVN from 6/5/67-12/25/67
"B" Co. 3rd Med Bn 3rd Mar Div RVN from 12/25/67 - 5/23/68
US Nav Hosp, St Albans NY from 6/14/68 - 12/15/98

Extensive operations in or around Phui Bia - Hue Phu Loc, Quang tri, Cobitontonvalley - Camp Evans Cumberland Rd Strong PT Base A*# - C2

Due to my Dads service, he suffered PTSD as well as two bouts of cancer. In1984, he had Hodgkins Disease, and 10 years later Father's day weekend he wasdiagnosed with Non-Hodgkins Lymphomia. We thought me Dad wouldn't make it tohis 50th birthday. But he proved us wrong, My Dad was 51 when he passed. He died of a massive heart attack (I believe this was caused by the recent changein his medicine.)

For Veterans Day this year, my husband, Scott, and I drove the Washington. Itwas only three months sinced my Dad passed and I really needed to talk to him.It was wonderful. After visiting my Dad at Arlington for approx two hours, wewent to The Wall. It was very moving. I felt as if my Dad was there with me.After the services that were going on, Scott and I walked The Wall. Twice.Since my Dad's passing, this was the closest that I felt to him. It was great.My husband and I have vowed to head to The Wall for every Veteran's Day. It isdefinitely an experience that everyone should have at least once in thierlifetime. It was a great pleasure to see all the men and women who gave me thefreedom that I have today. To all of the Vets that didnt make it home and toall those that have, THANK YOU from the bottom of my heart!

To all the Marines: SEMPER FI.
My I one day run into all of you at The Wall.

I remain........Elissa-Maxine Siegel-Cohen.

Daughter of Jack Siegel (3/29/47 - 8/12/98)
One of the Greatest Dad's in the World
US Navy Corpsman

P.S. Dad - I'll always remember "Positive Thinking". I love you Dad!


T/Sgt.Richard M. Cole, Jr USAF
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 18 June 1972

T/Sgt. Richard M. Cole Jr. USAF, a member of C-130A Crew shot down 6/18/72 over Ashau Valley, South Vietnam...

"A MAN IS NOT DEAD UNTIL HE IS FORGOTTON."

Beverly Haire


Guadalupe Nunez, Jr.
Vietnam Veteran
U.S. Army

Guadalupe passed away on 19 November, 1998 in San Antonio, TX.Among his decorations were the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V" and oneOak Leaf Cluster denoting a second award and the Combat Infantryman Badge. He was also awarded the Air Medal withOak Leaf Cluster.

He will be remembered by his family and many friends at the Audie L. Murphy Veterans Hospital and the 149th M.P. Unit of the Army National Guard.

Interment will be on Monday, 23 November with full Military Honors in the Fort Sam Houston National Cemetary.

Richard James Kuebler
Sgt. USMC
Bravo 1/9, 3rd Mar.Div.
Vietnam Veteran

Richard James Kuebler Born July 25, 1948- Passed away January 25, 1995 hewas the age of 47, passed away by cause of agent orange, he was pronouncebrain dead, at 6:05 on that day, due to Perypheial Neuropathy, a massivecoronary heart attack

His awards included the Vietnamese Cross of Gallantry awarded in 1969-70when he saved his platoon of 15 men from death

a poem......

when i must leave you

when i must leave you for a little while, please do not grieve and shed wildtears, and hug your sorrow to you through the years.

But start out bravelywith a gallent smile, and for my sake and in my name live on and do allthings the same.

Feed not your loneliness on empty days, but fill each wakinghours in useful ways.

Reach out you hand in comfort and in cheer and i inturn, will comfort you and hold you near;

and never, never, be afraid to die,for i am waiting for you in the sky.

from someone very special given to me

I loved you much and lost you now, and you are free to roam the clouds likean eagle in flight,,,,,,,,,,,,

Brenda Kuebler

His memory lives on with the rest of his friends,SEMPER FIDELIS to all who gave their lives for our country


Robert A. Gentile, Sr.
SSG US Army
Vietnam '65-69

In Memory of Robert A. Gentile, Sr August 21, 1998SSG US Army Vietnam '65-'69

You served your country with honor and asked for so little in return.Although you made it home to us, your soul died there. All you ever wantedwas peace in your heart and mind. Well, it took nearly 30 years, but you arefinally home and at a long deserved rest.

I love you so very much and although our road was never easy, I wouldn't havehad it any other way. Take care and sleep well.

Love Your Son, Rob


Tony W. Russo
Private, U.S. Army
WW II Veteran

Mr. Tony Russo was born in New Castle P.A on July 19, 1920, Hepassed away on Oct 25, 1998 in Youngstown, Ohio.He has been married to Mrs. Mary Russo for 56 years and had 2 daughters,Mrs. Marcella Fauver and Mrs. Marydonna Nelson.

Dear grandpa. You suffered for 41/2 years from your stroke, and yourtime came. We all hated to see you go but now you are resting in peace. Wemiss you very much and we all love you. Dylan misses you too, he always looksfor you, and when he finds your picture he kisses it. We all love you........

Love: Lori Nelson and your whole family


William Wilson, Jr.
Vietnam Veteran
U.S. Army

William Wilson Jr. passed away 11-15-98 at his residence (cause of deathat this time not known) 50 yr old Army Vietnam Vet. A native of Sacramento,Calif. He came to the Augusta, GA. VA to get help for his PTSD a few yearsback.

We Love you William. Rest easy. You have earned it.

From his friends

MSGT Roger Wayne Guy
U.S. Air Force (ret)
Vietnam Veteran

My husband Roger Wayne Guy passed away April 25,1997 he was diagnosed with Nonhodgkins Lymphoma in 1987. He had a heart attack in May of 1996 and he could not get well after open heart surgery. his lymph nodes had been cooked from radiation. the Dr told us he would have gotten well if not for that he stayed in conjestive heart failure. Agent Orange was the the reason he passed away.

He served at DaNang Air Field 18 months. His Date of birth was Jan 8 1945 and he died on April 25 1997.

We Love and miss him so very much.Wife Sandra, Daughters Vickie,Kim,Shawn Grandson born 1 month and 2 weeks after his death.

He was a wonderful husband and a wonderful father. He will always be with us. He is buried at Andersonville National Cementary In Montazuma Ga.

We Love you Roger and Dad and PePa.

Sandra Guy

Bill (William) Garvin
Vietnam Veteran
U.S. Air Force

Bill (Willam) Garvin died October 4 1998 in St.Pete, FL. he was in the AirForce but served with the 3rd Force Recon in 67-68. Bill returned to Vietnam in 1969to work CORDS . Bill did stuff you only read about in books, but wasthe salt of the Earth. He will be missed by all of his friends.

Bill I can only hope it is better where you are now.

Your friend and fellow Vietnam Vet,

Jim Vandergriff
2/503/173 Abn


Jack Meyer Siegal
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran

My father Jack Meyer Siegel passed away August 12, 1998. He is buriedin Arlington National Cemetary.

He died of a massive heart attack, caused byhis heart problems, caused by Agent Orange. My father had two bouts of Cancerdue to this Agent Orange. In 1984 he had Hodgkins Lymphomia, and in 1994,Father's Day weekend, we was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkins Lymphomia. My dad wasonly 51.

He served in the 3rd Batt. 3rd Marines.

Semper Fidelis.


Captain Edgar Robert Melton
U.S. Air Force
Vietnam Veteran

My brother-in-law Captain Edgar Robert Melton,Bob as he so liked to be called,was killed on the C-5 Galaxy that crashed during the orphan airlift on April 4, 1975.

His brother LTC (RET) Jackson D.Melton MSC USA respectfully pays tribute to you on this Veteran's Day 1998.

Submitted by Carole Melton LTC(RET)
ANC 24th EVAC Hospital Vietnam 71-72

John David Garton
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran

John David Garton Army 16th Signal Co. served with Decca Unit inVietnam. John was born May 7, 1949 and died November 10,1997. he isburied in Friendship Finley Cemetery ,Upper Deerfield N.J.

He loved the Army and missed all his buddies who died or he could no longer see. Vietnam was his whole life.It was a sad time for all. and their Family's.

I thank everyonewho served . Rita Jo Garton-Nuytens


JOHNNY MANUEL CRUZ
U.S ARMY
VIETNAM VETERAN

You died along time ago. I was just a kid, However I still had'ntforgotten you. You have a niece. She has our dark hair and eyes. She knowsabout you I have told her about you. How you and I use to wrestle on thefloor and you let me win.

You are gone but not forgotten.

I LOVE YOU BIGBROTHER!!!!

Love,
your little Angelina

Bill Secor
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 2 July 1970

Bill and I grew up in Kelso, Wa., a small town located in SouthwestWashington. We graduated from high school the same year 1968. We playedLittle League baseball together and competed in other sports as we grew up.

After graduation I got married and never saw Bill again, we served in Vietnamat the same time period. Bill was killed by a land mine on July 2, 1970.Although, we were never close I often think of him. He was a very quiet whoalways competed hard giving his all, as I am sure he did as a soldier.

On this Veterans Day I am filled with emotion as I think of him and all thefriends I served with in Vietnam. No one but those who served can reallyunderstand the deep kinship Veterans feel toward each other knowing thedifficult times and ordeals we shared during our brief but intense timetogether.

Those feelings for me will be with me for a lifetime although I probaby willnever see the people I served with I will always hold them dear in mythoughts.

Sincerely,
Joe Smart
Vietnam 2/8/70 to 12/24/70

JAMES CHARLES BOLT
JULY 11, 1939 TO APRIL 22, 1998

SERVED IN VIETNAM IN 64-66

DIED FROM SERVICE CONNECTED WOUNDS


Charles Orrison
Vietnam Veteran

Charles Orrison, 49 ,of Kalamazoo, Michigan a veteran of the Vietnam war passed away at a local nursing home from complications of multiple sclerosis.

Chuck was very courageous and inspired me his physical therapist.

Gary Corradini p.t.

Captain Roy Edward Shaw
U.S. Army
KIA 6 December, 1970

I have been looking for relatives or someone who cared for Roy Edward Shaw -261-623-460 Captain - DOB 10-2-39 - Died in Quang Ngai province on December6, 1970 while we were chasing 6 heavily armed VC. He was from Bowling GreenFlorida.

Shaw died instead of me when he stepped on a very large land mine that I hadpassed just a few minutes earlier. It should have been me and I have livedwith the guilt for 37 years. I have always wondered if anyone but methought of him. Can you help

Steve Letson
520-532-7222


Bob Wilson
US Army
First Infantry Division
Vietnam

Bob Wilson served two tours in Vietnam. His second tour was in "A" company2/2 First Infantry Division. He survived many things in Vietnam but hecouldn't survive the treatment that he received at the White RiverJunction, VT VAMC. Unnecessry surgery finished Bob. After all that he hadsurvived he ended up in a little box, in a little hole, in a littlecemetary, in a little town in Vermont.

R.I.P. Bob

Your friend Jim Thompson RTO First Infantry Division 66-68

Kenneth D. Adams
Born June 5, 1940
Died July 1984

Two tours in Vietnam. Served with 213 ASHC 'Black Cat' Squadron.

We miss you so much little brother.

L Adams

Jack "Rusty" Gaines
US Navy 1959 - 1963
AE2 - Served at various Naval Air Stations
Died - November 7, 1998
Services - November 11, Veteran s Day, 1998, Omaha, NE

From his friend John Rossie

Michael Lee Scott
US Army
Vietnam Veteran
July 20 1951 - Oct. 18 1993
i would like to include my cousin Micheal Lee Scott in the hall of taps. Hedied Oct 18,1993 from the effects of his service in Vietnam.

I miss himterribly and wish he washere today. because he was always there for me.

Thank you for hearing me

sent in by his cousin: dbene44809@aol.com

Michael Dean George
SP4, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 4 June 1967

My uncle Michael Dean George was killed in the Vietnam war. I never got a chanceto meet him, but would be honored if you could find his name on the walland place it here on this page. He went instead of my dad, and I amhonored to have such a hero as an uncle...

Michael is remembered on The Wall on Panel 21E - Row 056

Sent in by Tricia Malone


LCpl Donald Frederick Davidson
Capt William Thomas Harris
Sgt Larry Duane Jameson
1stLt Daniel Kepner Lessig
1stLt Arthur Gene Richardson
LCpl Luther Edmond Ritchey, Jr.*
Cpl Ronald Frank Skoviak
Cpl Charles Preston Tuthill
WO Charles F. Whitehead, Jr.
HM3 Manuel Reyes Denton*
HM Claude Rice
Lt Bruce Charles Farrell

All KIA October 8, 1963 Quang Nam Province, South Vietnam.*Body Not Recovered

Submitted by: FIRSTMAW@aol.com

Miles Presnell

My father Miles Presnell was in vietnam from68 to 69....he died feb.11 1996 in an automobile accident in Daytona BeachFL...he was in the army he is missed very much by family and friends.....thanks,

Brian Presnell

Lowell Edward Jones

Lowell Edward Jones1929-June 1, 1998Served in the United States Air ForceServed in the Korean War.

God Bless you Uncle Jones...and thanks !

Cindy Lee Gettle

Donald Ray Staglik

It is with a heavy heart that I tell you of the passing of another one of our brothers. Donald Ray Staglik, known as Don from San Antonio, TX. He served in the US Navy and in Vietnam from 1972-1973.

He was a Medic, I have been unable to find out his unit as of yet. There is a Memoral Service for Don tomorrow at 1 p.m. I am requesting pray for his soul and for his wife Patty, 2 sons and a daughter and his very large extended family.

I spent alot of time talking and listening to this man, he was a wonderful person and friend.

Thank you for posting this for me.

Arline

Kerry Duane French, Sr.

Kerry Duane French, Sr.
"Frenchie"
September 28, 1934 - January 1, 1983
HM1 1st Class (Navy)
Served in Vietnam for two tours
Dec. 1965 - Feb. 1967

He was attached to the Helicopter Squadron 263, Marine Air Group 16 operatingout of Marble Mountain in South Vietnam.He had 412 Combat flying hours to his credit
11 Air Medals
3 Purple Hearts
and numerous other medals

My father passed away on January 1, 1983, from Lymphoma which was caused by Agent Orange, he was 48 yrs old.

"Our Daddy....is surely missed!"We love you.....Kathy, Duane, and "Debie "Do"!

Again, thank you for doing this fine deed for our Men and Women who served inthe Military Forces and May God Bless You.

KatherineFrench Smith (oldest daughter)

Fredrick (Fritz) Neidhardt

Cw3 Frederick{fritz}Neidhardt., DFC
1st Inf Div 1/4th Cav Dark horse
.Passed away suddenly 27.7.97.
Two trips to Vietnam but the big C took him from us,Prepared and Loyal

Survived by wife 3 children and 7 grandchildren.......

Sent to us by: Lynne Neidhardt
Idaho

Richard W. Bomberger Jr.

Retired Col. Richard Watson Bomberger Jr., 70, of 18911 Waldron Place,Hagerstown, died Friday, March 6, 1998, at Homewood Retirement Center,Williamsport.

Born June 11, 1927, in Baltimore, he was the son of the late RichardWatson Bomberger Sr. and Catherine Downs Schnebly Bomberger.

He was a graduate of St. James School, Franklin and Marshall College,U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Industrial College of theArmed Forces and the Defense Language Institute.

He entered the U.S. Army in 1950 as a recruit and attained the rank ofmaster sergeant.

He attended Army Officers Candidate School at Fort Riley, Kan., andwas commissioned a second lieutenant, Medical Service Corps. Heattended Medical Field Service School, Brooke Army Medical Center,Fort Sam Houston, San Antonio, Texas; assigned Medical ReplacementTraining Center, Camp Pickett, Va.

He was promoted to first lieutenant, assigned to the Office of theSurgeon General, Department of the Army, Washington, D.C. Heattended an Airborne, Jumpmaster and Pathfinder course.

As a major his assignments included ROTC Instructor Group,Pennsylvania State University; assistant professor, teaching MilitaryLaw and Military Operations, instructor ROTC Summer Camps at FortGeorge G. Meade, Md., and Indiantown Gap Military Reservation, Pa. Hewas instructor at Military Assistance Institute, course on Middle East,Arlington, Va.; U.S. Training Mission Saudi Arabia, as an infantryadvisor Saudi Arabian Infantry.

As a lieutenant colonel, his assignments included U.S. Army SpecialWarfare Center, Fort Bragg, N.C.; Military Assistance Command,Executive Officer Studies and Observations Group, Saigon, Vietnam;deputy senior adviser Vietnamese Airborne Division in Saigon and TayNinh.

As a colonel, he was assigned to Headquarters 18th Airborne Corps,Fort Bragg, N.C. He retired in 1974.

He received the Silver Star, Bronze Star, Purple Heart and 38 othermedals, badges and citations.

He was of the Episcopal faith.

He was a member of Franklin and Marshall Academy and College AlumniAssociation, St. James School Alumni Association, Pennsylvania StateUniversity Alumni Association, Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity, RetiredOfficers Association, 82nd Airborne Division Association, U.S. NavalInstitute, National Rifle Association, Korean War Veterans Association,Smithsonian Institution Associates, and Veterans of Foreign Wars. Hewas a life member of Disabled American Veterans and Morris Frock Post42 American Legion.

He is survived by his wife, Sarah S. Bomberger; two daughters, MaryCatherine Frances Rhodes of Lancaster, Pa., and Anne ElizabethHopkins of Lititz, Pa.; one son, Michael David Bomberger of Alexandria,Va.; and five grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by one son, Richard Watson Bomberger III.

Services were held Wednesday at 2 p.m. in the chapel of St. James School.The Rev. J. Stuart Dunnan and the Rev. Kenneth J. Dorsch officiated.Burial was in Boonsboro Cemetery, Boonsboro, with militarygraveside honors conducted by Morris Frock Post 42 American Legion.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to St. James School,St. James, Md. 21781.

Sent to us by: Dan Fisher, MSG(Ret) US Army



I am only 35 years old but I wish to relay my thanks to all the familiesthat have lost loved ones in war. I hope that I can relay a feeling thatI have and a patriotism that I feel when I hear what these people didand how they lived. I would like to extend my prayers and thoughts tothe lost ones and there family and friends

Please post this message to all who have posted to your page!!

Thank You

Michael Duggan

Daniel Luce

Daniel Luce, US Army, died four years ago and is buried in a cemetary in Pittsburg,PA


Marlin L. Siegwalt
Captain, United States Air Force
KIA 30 October 1968

Marlin was killed while serving as a RAVEN FAC in Laos. He is remembered by his friends. Rest in Peace


Dwight York
September 8 1998
US Army
Big Red One

Dwight Died of Hepatitis C contacted inVietnam on Sept 8
He was 50 years old

Submitted by Mel Ellis


Steve Nelson
Age 49
US Army
A proud Vietnam Veteran

Died of a heart attack in Arizona on September 7, 1998

Submitted by: Larry L. Keeler, Ahwatukee, Arizona on 09/12/98

" My friend, you've boarded the Freedom Bird, at last "


Thedward Othel Clark
Vietnam Veteran

I wanted to let you know aboutthe death of my uncle.

Thedward Othel Clark passed away almost four years ago (fours years at Thanksgiving time...24 November, 1994). Thed was around 45 or 46 when hepasses away, so he was reeally young. Thed served two terms in the VietNam War. I don't know how old he was when he served but he couldn't havebeen over 18 or 19.

You see he went back for the second term so my dadwould not have to go and fight. I think that was an awesome thing he did. If you don't already have his name on the list of those who have passedaway and who served. Please put him on there. Thank you very much.

Sincerely,
Jennifer Clark
age 18


Capt. Larry A.Dickerson
"Charlie" 1/4
3 September, 1998

Larry will be sorely missed by his Family and friends.He was loved by all who knew him!

Larry was another casuality of the Vietnam War!Semper Fi Brother,You will live forever in our Hearts!

Jack Hartzel

My name is Ronald John Dickerson. I noted the sad passing of Captain LarryA. Dickerson. Although I did not have the honour of knowing him, but in thatwe share the same surname and I am interested in the Vietnam war, I waswandering if you could furnish me with his families address.

I realize this may be highly irregular and would understand if this cannot bedone. Please send the family my deepest sympathy and I can identify in theirsad loss in that my mom suddenly was called home on the 09/22/98.

I have an admiration and respect for all those who bravely served theircountry and payed the highest price.Kind regards

Ronald John Dickerson.

Jimmy Castleberry
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
1 September 1998


The following information was provided by Mark Gallant, Sr.

Jimmy Castleberry died Tuesday at the Milledgeville Mental Health Facility, Jimmy was aVietnam Veteran that had PTSD rated at 100%, he was an army veteran, he was 48 years of age.He was preceded in death by his brother Harry who died 10 years ago, Harry also had 100%PTSD. Both of these men were my friends, I helped carry Harry to his final resting place, I cantdo it for Jimmy, my legs are too messed up but I send with Jimmy the fond memories of the funwe had at our weekly meetings. Harry and Jimmy were two of the finest black men I have everknown, I am proud to have been able to call them friends.

Mark H. Gallant SR.
B Brty 2nd LAAMS MAG18
1st MAR DIV Chu Lai 1968


More information will be provided as it becomes available

Kenneth Warren Howard
Crawford, Tennessee SP5 Co A, 326th ENGR BN
101st ABN
USARPAC
Date of entry: Sept. 20, 1966 ---May 24, 1969

My husband passed away April 30, 1993. He was a paratrooper in the 101stAirborne division of the Army.

Ken spent two years in Vietnam. He went over for 13 months, and thenvolunteered twice for six months each.

We were married 24 years and have three children together. We have 4grandchildren,

Ken died from Lymphoma related to exposure from Agent Orange.

Kens memory is still fresh. He loved life and was a peopleperson. He had a brilliant light side but also a pitch black dark side from his war experiences, and it left our family with problems that are hard to deal with.

Mrs. Kenneth Warren Howard


Kenneth James Champion
July 12 1949 - December 12 1997


Ken Joined the U.SArmy at the age of 17 and was sent to Viet Nam.as a member of 173rdAirborne from 1967-1968.

He was awarded numerous medals includingthe Bronze Star and two Purple Hearts.

He will be missed by manyVeterans and friends.
Ken Died From a heart attack

Written by Len Hawley


03/08/67

Cpl. Thomas Gopp USMC,
HM3 James McGrath USN,
L/Cpl John Nahan USMC,
L/Cpl Jack Wolpe USMC

KIA 3 August 1967
During the emergency extraction of reconnaissance patrol
Partyline One
in the A Shau Valley, Vietnam

Their bodies were not recovered

They are remembered by their team mates from 3rd Reconnaissance Battalion, 3rd Marine Division

May they rest in Peace


Wayne M. Caron
HM3, U.S. Navy
Medal of Honor
27 July, 1967

7/27/68 Wayne M. Caron HM3 ( USN ). Medal of Honor. Died this day with 25 ofthe toughest Marines who ever "humped the bush". The toughest man that day wasa sailor and my friend. Now in the quiet of the night thirty years after theshouts and screams I remember.

R.N.Evans


Ken Masamitsu
U.S. Army

From: SANDRA I GOLDIN

For anyone who knew Ken Masamitsu, 93rd Ecav, Long Binh - surgical tech from 1/70-12/70. He had a heart attack on 7/15/98 and died on 7/16/98 at the age of 49. His funeral is Tuesday 7/21/98 in San Jose, California at the Oak Hill Memorial Park on Curtner Ave.

Additional Information will be passed as it becomes available.


Jack Norton
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam

From: Orson Swindle

A former PLC classmate of mine, Jack Norton, former FBI agent and Chiefof Public Safety in Foster City, CA (San Francisco area) passed awaylast week after long and painful bout with cancer. Jack was badlywounded in Vietnam, was awarded the Navy Cross, a couple of BronzeStars and Purple Hearts. He took a leave of absence and volunteered togo to Vietnam as an infantry officer. One tough dude and a helluva guy. A real hero by accounts that I've read. He had a great law enforcementcareer, very active in Rotary. Reminds us all we are mortal.


L/Cpl. Ronald Lee Longanecker, USMC

On 8 July 1966 the first Marine was killed in action from hostile causes in Quang Tri Province.


7/6/98
Master Sergeant Russell Curtis, USMC (ret.) passed away on 13 June, 1998.

Russell was seriously wounded when he threw himself on a live grenade, saving a number of his fellow Marines near Danang. He was awarded the Navy Cross


7/4/98
Major General Marion Carl, USMC (retired) WW-II, Korea, and Vietnam Veteran.
6/30/98
Members of Reconnaissance Team Striker 30 June 1967


6/24/98
Nash Montanez Hernandez

Vietnam Veteran

We lost a dear friend this week. Nash passed away on the 24th of June. A full blooded Mescalero Indian and accomplished musician, Nash performed traditional Native American music at Memorial Day and Veterans Day services at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Angel Fire, New Mexico. We will miss him...his spirit lives on amongst us.

Tributes from Friends