Taps Gallery, Part II


David F. Miller
Sgt. USAF
69-70
Binh Dinh Province
Died September 26th, 1999

Good bye, Buddy
I'll miss our talks
and your advice

Charlie Logue


Paul Kierstead Moser
ADJ3, U.S. Navy
VietNam Veteran
KIA 2 October, 1969

02-Oct-1999

Dear America

I just had to say something today and I hope that America reads this. 30 years ago, today, we lost Paul Kierstead Moser USN -born 05-02-46. His home of reord is Newington, Conn. He is someone I never met, but I have worn his braclet on my arm for many years. He was lost in a C2A "Greyhound" (transport) over water in NVN. There were 25 others on board according to the manifest as well as the Navy's first press release.

I want someone else besides myself to know that today was really hard on me, everday is thinking of how he and many others were left to die there, and most don't care. It breaks my heart. Some of us still fight. I wish so badly that I could someday hand this bracelet to Paul and finally welcome him home! I still wait.

I have 2 pictures of Paul that his mom so graciously sent me years ago . He was blonde w/blue eyes, 6 ft tall and never got a chance to live his life. You see, he was just 22 years old. I have tried my best to get any information I can even getting configurations on the C2A. Got ahold of a best friend of one of those on board the plane, he was on the USS Constellation, top side and he tells a TOTALLY DIFFERENT STORY than the DOD accounts. Surprise!!

I know I wrote some of the circumstances and did not write things of my heart, but my heart is heavy and hurts. Doesn't ANYBODY CARE?? We lost 26 heroes that day!!! I still wear your bracelet, Paul, even during my stint in the Navy (yes, I joined for the Gulf War) and like Paul, made rank to E-4 and an airdale just like him.

Please, America, never forget those that gave their all for you, never take it for granted, it was paid with the greatest price. The lives of those who never returned, and the hearts of those that did. I love all those who served in Vietnam, families and friends that supported those that returned. I learned those lessons of courage, honor and what freedom meant from Nam Vets and from my beloved father who also served. My dearest Paul, though we never met, I can't stop dreaming that someday we will.

I miss you, my brother. Please come home soon!
And God Bless All of our Vietnam Veteran's!
You served with HONOR!!
Many of us knew that all along!

dtusnavy@webtv.net


Raymond T. Conway
Sergeant, USMC
VietNam Veteran
KIA 19 September, 1968

MARINE SGT. RAY CONWAY,K.IA. WHILE WITH 2ND BN. 3RD.MARINES IN1968 AFTER THIRD TOUR.

A FINE AMERICAN,GREATLY MISSED.

YOUR FRIEND, SGT. RUSS KERSEY


Arthur Offenberg
April 18, 1948 - February 2, 1986
VietNam Veteran
1971 - 1973

To the man who was kindest person I ever knew, and we loved each other very much. He was my husband for a while. The war took him away.

I'll always love you Arthur, someday I will be with you.

Patty


Merle Joseph Thomas
U.S. Marine Corps
India Company
3rd Battalion, 27tha Marines
Vietnam Veteran
January 25, 1949 - June 14, 1997

To be a man
And counted among the best
To stand tall as a Marine
Was his greatest quest.

Surviving Vietnam itself was tough
The passing years would also prove rough.

The men of the Corps that he met along the way
He held close to his heart until his dying day.
For him to find eternal peace, now I do pray.

He faced life with his head held high
Remaining true to the Corps
As the years went by.

My brother, my friend, my proud Marine,
I loved you from beginning to end and each day in between.
And so at last with a tear in my eye,
I salute you with this final "Semper Fi."

Merle Joseph Thomas died on June 14, 1997 of injuries sustained in a motorcycle accident. We all loved him very much and pray that he has found the peace and solace that he so deserved after all of the years of turmoil and struggle. I love you always and forever, Joe!!

Raeann Thomas, sister


MM3 Anthony G. Suchanek
U.S. Navy
Vietnam Veteran
Died: September 1989

I sit back and read these letters, blessings of peace to their souls, and I can't help but hope my Father has finally found his. I grew up, sheltered from the fact he was a veteran. He would go back to 1969 and disappear for days, and my mother would cover for him, to his family, his business partner, and myself. The war had torn him up so badly that he didn't even know himself sometimes. The screams in the middle of the night, not knowing where he had been, but yet still knowing in a sense. He was trapped between two time periods, with no idea how to manage the past or deal with the present. Seeing dead and gone friends in other peoples faces.

I sit here with tears in my eyes right now, trying to understand how this could have been happening to him, everyday without peace in your mind for 20 years. He died in front of me in Sept of 1989 of a "sudden death" heart attack. I was 13 at the time, but my Mom had told me some of the things that were happening, she couldn't cover for him anymore. When he died, I became so furious at him,for years, because I couldn't help him. The only comfort I have is that now he sits with his father, together again, watching me grow up, screw up once in a while, but knowing that I love him more everyday, because I know he would never have forgotten about me either.

From what I know he was in country from 69-70. He ran a PBR in the Mekong, Laos, Cambodia, and other areas our government refuses to recognize. He saw alot of action to say the least. The 10th anniversary of his death is coming up soon, and this was my way of giving him a tribute. I was wondering if you knew of any sites a guy could check out in the area of service my father was in. The only ones I found made the war sound like a damn party running PBR's. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Zack Suchanek
stage1@rapidnet.com


SSgt. Ira H. Perkins
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA July 1966

I would like to send a tribute to a Special SSgt. I once Knew SSgt. Ira H. Perkins KIA in Kontum Prov.07/66 ( Bout a days march from Dak-to)

To SSG Ira H Perkins Sarge you were the best Plt. Sgt a green kid could've had.

Not a Day goes by that I don't think of you. We all were saddened of the news of your dieing at Dak-to. You were a soldiers Soldier. You are always in my thoughts and prayers.

Your buddy Nick
1st/327 Abn.Inf
101st Airborne
A Co. 3rd plt.
ABU


SSgt. Gregory R. Benton, Jr.
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
MIA: 23 May 1969

My name is Mary and I am the proud sister of Staff Sergeant Gregory R. Benton, Jr., Missing in Action in Vietnam since May 23, 1969. Greg was with with 1/9, 3rd Mar Div. (the Walking Dead).

I am a veteran, as well. I joined the Army in 1976 in an effort to learn more about military records, etc. so that I could understand my brother's investigation and learn what really happened to him at Hill 891 at Khe Sanh.

Mary Benton
1630 Rush Avenue
Vista, CA 92084


Bruce A. Jokinen
U.S. Army Special Forces
Vietnam Veteran
Died: 2 January 1996

     BRUCE A. JOKINEN
    06/23/46 - 01/02/96
 
AN AMERICAN SPECIAL FORCES SOLDIER.
A MAN WORTHY OF HIS HIRE!
HE BELIEVED IN THE IDEALS OF LIBERTY, EQUALITY, AND FRATERNITY.
HIS ACTIONS WERE THE THEATER OF HIS SOUL.
 
SPECIAL FORCES ASSOCIATION
 
Bruce Jokinen is my father. He served his country in the war and spent the rest of his life suffering from the memories of it. He was a good man living with haunting memories. Things he experienced in his lifetime I will never have to endure, but I get tears in my eyes when I think of the pain he went through. I am proud that he is my father and I know I will be in his arms again. For now I feel comfort in knowing that he is heaven, where nothing can hurt him. He is at peace, with his family, his old war buddies, and he is watching over the family he left behind.
                                                        I WILL MISS HIM ALWAYS
124-248 GOOGLE DAD
 
THE GEATEST GIFT I EVER HAD
CAME FROM GOD
I CALL HIM DAD.
 
 
 

My Brother Darryl
Vietnam Veteran
Died September 1999

This email was sent to me this week by a co-worker, Beverly.

Her brother took his life this past week. He was interred at Arlington Cemetary on Friday.


Subject: My Brother

I needed to put into words feeling I have for my brother, Darryl. I have jotted an open letter to him and wanted my friends to know just a little bit about him, and the childhood memories I will treasure. The following is how I will bid my brother good-bye tomorrow.

In 1966 Viet Nam a grenade landed nearby and shredded your body with shrapnel. I saw what that violent blast did to you physically. I did not know, nor will I ever know what that horrific event did to your mind, indeed, to your very soul.

I am not angry and do not blame you for your final act. How could I? I did not see what your eyes saw when they closed at night. I know there were nights when they would not, could not close. You were fatally wounded that day,

it just took you 33 years to die.

Your note indicated you were growing weary of the pain. I understand. You shot yourself through the heart, is that the part of you that hurt the most, dear brother?

I will not dwell on "what-if's" or "maybe's", it will serve no purpose. Instead I will hold fond memories of you.

The big brother who steadied my bike handle bars when I was learning to pedal.

The big brother who bobbed up and down in that scary deep-end of the pool and urged me to jump. You promised to catch me. I did finally jump that day, and true to your word, you caught me.

The big brother who taught me how to swing a bat and toss a ball...hmmm... hey did you secretly want a baby brother, and then I came along?

I hope not, 'cause I was proud to be your kid sister. That pride remains with me today. Your heart is no longer beating. I take no comfort from that. I am comforted knowing that your heart is no longer aching.

God Bless You and farewell, sweet brother.

I love you..... and I always will.

Beverly


Rodney David Wilson
PFC U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 3 July 1969

My name is Gregory L. West. My cousin, Rodney David Wilson was killed in Vietnam in July 1969. He was from Topeka Kansas. The reason I am writing is I have read the poetry on the web site and would like one of mine included. I wrote this after talking to a friend of Rodney's, he is a Vietnam Veteran. Please email me at if you will include the enclosed poem.

Green on Green
by Gregory L. West (copyright GL West 1994)

Parents say good-bye to son.
Family, friends; I've got a gun.
Point it there, shoot it straight.
Trigger squeeze, bullet mates.

Green on green touch of red.
Pistol whips the children fed.
Manboy sent to kill the foe.
Who is the enemy? Who should know?

New friends now in silent rage.
Brothers of this jungle cage.
Vision? Dream? Nightmare scene.
You'll never be where he has been.

Sentenced to the walk of death.
Out on point holding breath.
Listen hard for silent sound.
Hear the sweat drop to the ground.

Screaming enters ringing head.
Look around at brothers dead.
Try and stop flowing life.
Too late now, Satan's knife.

Metal skies rain down fire.
Smell of death always tires.
Dirty sweaty life in field.
Burning misery mind never heals.

Ghost dance in dark of night.
Morning day, different fright.
Three six five killing done.
Give them back their death song gun.

Year is gone, seems like five.
Death to friends, why alive?
Memory sounds of jungle rain.
Forever there, forever pain.

gwest100@hotmail.com


Joseph Patrick Clerkin
SM1 U.S. Navt
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 10 April 1969

Hello, my name is Katie Clerkin Brouillette. My father Joseph Patrick Clerkin died in Vietnam on 4/10/69

I would like as much info on him as possible.I don't know to much about him.

I was 7yrs old when he died, his mother disowned my family after he died, my mother doesn't talk to much about it or it's that I don't want her to hurt by talking about it .

What I would like is to find other men that served with him or knew him then. His service branch was the Navy, rank SMI, service #4546810. His tour began 680528.

If you could help me I thank you.

Katie Brouillette

Please email with with any info at: fraidnot@n-jcenter.com


Michael T. Flynn
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died 3 August 1999

MICHAEL T. FLYNN, 52, of St. Petersburg, FL, died 8/3/99 at Hospice House Woodside of lung cancer. He had been there approximately one week. He came here in 1971 from his native Philadelphia. He was a welder at a local environmental care product company.

He was a Vietnam Army veteran, serving with the 117 Air Cavalry, 10th Aviation Battalion, a recipient of the National Defense Service Medal, the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, an Air Medal with three Oak Clusters, the Republic of Vietnam Campain Medal, an Air Medal with "V" Device. He was a member of the Flathead Owners Group of St. Petersburg.

Surviving family information is in the St. Pete Times news on 8/6/99. He was our brother, a very quiet person and he did not share with many his Vietnam experiences. An extraordinary number of people braved the heat exhaustion Sunday for the viewing, and many brothers/sisters accompanied by all the old Flathead, Panhead, Shovelhead, American Legion family escorted him to the Bay Pines, VA, cemetery Monday, 8/9/99, to his final internment.

We share this with you as we know how hard it is to remember names, dates., etc., and possibly someone will be now comforted. He will be sadly, quietly and deeply missed. Sleep peacefully, Brother... no more pain.

Love, Chops/Dancer


In Memory of PFC William J. Schmidt, SGT Phillip O. Richardson and a Native American of whom I cannot recall his name, KIA Aug.12,1969, 1st Combined Action Group, 3rd Combined Action Company, Binh Son District, Quang Ngai Province.

"Only the good Die Young"

May God Bless You


Jenning Leo McKinney
Vietnam Veteran
Died December 1998

THIS MAY SEEM VERY UNUSAL, BUT THE PERSON THAT I AM WRITING ABOUT IS MY FATHER. THIS IS THE ONLY PAGE THAT I HAVE BEEN ABLE TO FIND THAT WOULD LISTEN TO WHAT I HAVE TO SAY.

NO, HE DID'NT DIE IN VIETNAM,BUT MIGHT AS WELL HAVE, DONT GET ME WRONG, HE WAS A WONDERFUL MAN, JUST RECENTLY DIED IN HIS OWN HOME, NEVER FORGETTING THE MENS LIFE THAT HE SAVED,AND ALWAYS IN DEBT OF GRATITUDE TO THOSE THAT SAVED HIS, AND YOU HAVE MY UTMOST GRATITUDE FOR GIVING UP YOUR LIFE FOR ME.

FOR IF IT HAD NOT BEEN FOR THE MEN TO BE THERE FOR MY FATHER I WOULD NOT BE HERE, AND I WILL NOT PUT RANKS OR DEPARTMENT OF WHAT EVER SERVICES, LETS JUST SAY THAT EVERYONE DID THEIR DUTY FOR THE COUNTRY AND FOR ME AND THE THOUSANDS 70'S BABYS, BUT THIS I DO HAVE TO WRITE.

MY DADDY DIED IN DECEMBER OF 98 , AND I GOT A LETTER FROM PRESIDENT CLINTON IT READS:

THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
HONORS THE MEMORY OF
JENNING LEO McKINNEY

THIS CERTIFICATE IS AWARDED BY A GRATEFUL NATION IN RECOGNITION OF DEVOTED AND SELFLESS CONSECRATION TO THE SERVICE OF OUR COUNTRY IN THE ARMED FORCES OF THE UNITED STATES

WILLIAM J CLINTON
THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

GOD BLESS YOU ALL.



Vernon Joseph Miller, Jr.
Cpl. U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA February 29 1968

Dear Borther (and possibly Sister) veterans,

I am a service-conected disabled veteran of the Navy, I served 1976 to 79 but I am writing to tell you a little bit about my brother.

Vernon Joseph Miller, Jr. RA 13 800 150 was a PFC (posthumously advanced to Cpl.) who served in Vietnam with Company B, 3rd Battalion, 47th Infantry of the 9th Division

Rumor has it that he was attached to the Mobile Riverine Forces

What I do know:
His name is on panel 42E, Line 7 of the Wall.
His date of death is recorded as 26 FEB 68.
but his tombstone reads: 29 FEB 68.
The telegram which "announced" his death is dated 5 MAR 68 and gives the date of death as 29 FEB 68.
He was killed in action in the Phong Dinh Province, RSV. I take this to imply that he was either humping it out as a regular grunt or he was patroling the delta on a MRF boat.

What matters to me is that he is dead, and now that I am 40, and that my eyes have opened, I miss him.

His 1st Louie was Edward E. Ridgley, Inf.

I am seeking ANYONE who might have knew my brother or served in the Company/Battalion/Unit he was in.

I would love to hear from anyone regarding my brother, good or bad.

E-mail or write me
Rommel John Miller
12544 Selsey Road
Ocean City, MD 21842-9128

rjmiller@mail.beachin.net or rjmiller1095@juno.com


James David Wise
Cpl. U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 16 September, 1967

My brother Cpl. James David Wise died in country on September 16, 1967. He was in the First Air Cavalry, 1/9. Please remember him on his anniversary.

Sadly missed by his parents, five siblings, seven nieces and nephews.

MaryKay Wise Schnare


This is in response to a message on TAPS for Cpl James David Wise, KIA 16 Sept. 1967, member of 1/9 Cav.

Being a fellow brother in arms who also served in the 1st Cav division May 1966 to May 1967, I will place an american flag at the California Vietnam Veterans Memorial on September 16, 1999. It is marked on my calender. Cpl Wise's name will be added to the Honor Roll and his named mention on Veterans Day at ceremonies conducted at the Mexican American Memorial sponsored by United Brotherhood of Vietnam Veterans and the 21 gun salute following by VFW Post 85 Honor Guard.

He will be remembered on that day and in our hearts and minds he will not be forgotten.

Humbly,

Steve(The Gook)Rivera
Commander, United Brotherhood
of Vietnam Veterans


Raymond Richard Gillock
SP5 U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 28 March 1968

Doc Gillock 1st 7th Cav.
Died 1968 near hill 270

You helped when no one else would
You never carried arms
You were always friendly
You saved my life more than once
You were & are above all else my friend
You will always smile in my memories

Drake


WILLIAM F. COUGHLIN
PFC. U.S. ARMY
DIED SEPTEMBER 9, 1998
HOLBROOK, MA.

My brother never talked about Viet Nam. I was eleven when he left. It was January 1967. He was in the 1st Med BN, 1st Inf. Div. He returned to live a quiet life. He remained in our family home where he died. Billy was devoted to his father and five younger sisters. A caring, sensitive man.

I found some of his letters as we cleaned my father's home in preparation to sell it (our Dad died six months prior to Billy).

It would mean a great deal to me to talk to someone who knew him in Nam. Although I will never understand that experience I want to know as much about my brother as I can. I am struggling with this loss, the guilt and sadness. My brother's death was a suicide. We miss him very much.

If anyone knew Billy please contact me at vfc4254@aol.com

His loving sister,

Ginny


Bill Akins
U.S. Navy
MCB 71
Vietnam Veteran
Died April 1999

A true friend and brother died last month. His name was Bill Akins, we served with MCB 71 of the U.S. Navy Seabees and did two tours of Nam. Bill was wounded at Phu Loc on our second tour.

He was a great husband, father and friend. He died in Columbus, OH from Pancreatitus.

He will be missed greatly.

'Til we meet again.
God Bless you Bro!!!!

Jerry "Cupo" Montecupo


Sgt. Ronald P. Ancell
Vietnam Veteran
Died 29 May 1998

My father Ronald P Ancell pasted away last year on May 29 he was a vietnam vet from 67 to 69. He was a sergeant and recieved many medals.

I just wanted everyone to know that I was proud of him

Thanks
Ronald D Ancell


Maurice Whitters
SSgt U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died December 1998

I would like to ad the name; S.Sgt Maurice Whitters, 4/8yrs. ,U.S.Army, Airborne Ranger. Served in Vietnam - 1968-9. He was highly decorated, including a silver star. His N.y.c friends called him "Moe", he was agreat friend ,a gentle-giant!

Moe passed away in a long island ,n.y hospital before x-mas, alone and beaten.

He deserved better! He was my best-friend.

We will meet again,

your friend
"Jayce"


In Memory of my Brother
First Lieutenant John E. Manning
U.S. Marine Corps
KIA in DaNang
January 30, 1968

We all called him Eddie and he was dearly loved by the entire family.

I was never allowed to see him as he was killed by a grenade and for a lot of years I would not believe he was gone. Anyone knowing him or was at the Air Base at DaNang when he was killed or knew him in any way please let me hear from you at :

mjr11@earthlink.net

Thank you very much.


Cpl John Thomas Wolfe
U.S. Army, Infantry
Born Dec. 1947 Paterson, N.J.
KIA Viet Nam June 1968

Still miss a great friend from Central H.S, and Seton Hall. I joined the Navy, Jack got drafted.

I was away when Jack got killed. My Dad informed me in a letter of his death. I never got a chance to say "good bye". I was never able to contact his folks ,George and Mary. I know they were devastated. Now, over the years, I've learned of their passing also.

There is no one to contact from his family. I knew of a cousin of Jack's who attended St. Peter's in J.C.

Anyone who knew Jack, either from school or the service, please contact: Bern Macones : email....... bmacones@bellatlantic.net

Jack, I really miss you, man. Gone too soon, too young! We never got a chance to grow up together. Never got a chance to get crazy. God Bless you and rest in peace.


Theodoor Kuno Schindeler
HN U.S. Navy
FMF Corpsman
Died 19 December 1998

"Teddy"

Vietnam claimed another life on December 19, 1998.

Ted Schindeler left behind his mother, father, sisters, brothers(a twin brother). He was a husband and a father of 4 children. He did not live to see his first grandchild - born 27 days after his death. He lost his battle with his flashbacks of Vietnam. Memories that made him an insomniac for the last 30 years. Unable to handle relationships, responsiblity...fatherhood.

I am not angry with him. I miss him, although I did not know him. Here is what I do know:

He was born in Aruba. His family moved to the United States when he was 17. He joined the Navy when he was 19. He left the Navy in 1970 and 3 months later became my dad. He left when I was eight. Fatherhood carried with it too much stress. I wish I knew more about him. I wish he knew more about me. I wish he met his first grandchild.

He received a Purple Heart and a Silver Star for the following:

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action on 2 February 1968 while serving as a corpsman with Company "D", First Battalion, Fourth Marines, Third Marine Division, in connection with operations against enemy forces in the Republic of Vietnam. During the early morning hours, the Cam Lo District Headquarters came under heavy artillery, mortar, and recoilless-rifle fire followed by a well-coordinated ground attack by a numerically-superior enemy force. Hearing cries for assistance from several Marines wounded during the initial barrage, Hospitalman Schindeler unhesitatingly left his covered position to move through hostile fire to the side of the wounded and administer first aid. While treating one of the casualties, he removed his flak jacket and helmet to cover the man in order to protect him from fragments of exploding enemy rounds near him. Displaying exceptional professional skill and composure, Hospitalman Schindeler courageously moved to each of the casualties to provide expert medical treatment, to comfort them, and to prepare them for evacuation from the fire-swept area. Due in large measure to his prompt and efficient medical treatment, numerous Marines were able to remain in their fighting positions and continue to deliver a heavy volume of fire against the assaulting force. After the five-hour engagement had ended, Hospitalman Schindeler advanced beyond the defensive perimeter to treat twenty-five injured enemy soldiers, saving lives that subsequently proved to be of inestimable value as intelligence sources. His courageous and selfless actions inspired all who observed him and were instrumental in the successful repulse of the attackers, which accounted for 144 enemy confirmed killed, 100 probable killed, the capture of 38 soldiers and the confiscation of numerous weapons and items of equipment. By his superior professionalism, bold initiative, and selfless devotion to duty at great personal risk, Hospitalman Schindeler upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.

According to the Office of Vital Statistics the "Cause of Death"... suicide, but I know differently. The Lord decided his hell on earth was over and took him home to rest.

I know he is finally at peace.
Rest in Peace Dad.
I love you.
Your daughter.


Michael Lee Scott
Vietnam Veteran
Died 18 October 1993

I would like to dedicate a page to micheal lee scott a vietnam veteran who i loved and whom i miss so much. He died Oct 18,1993 at the tender age of 42. he was a special guy to me and to my husband tom, also vietnam vet. His birthday is july 20, and he would of been 48. but god saw that this veteran needed a rest. and brought him home. .

Micheal lee scott i miss you so much 6 years hasn't dulled the pain of your loss. Happy birthday micheal we miss you god bless you !!

Dottie Benedict


YOUR SOULS ARE WITH ME EVERYDAY, THE FINEST MEN I EVER HAD THE PRIVLEGE TO KNOW.
MAY YOU REST IN PEACE.

C/4/503D 173D AIRBORNE 1967

EDWARD CLAEYS... DAVID JOHNSON... STEVEN HANIOTES... JAMES LESTER... ARTHUR TURNER... DEWAYNE DUBB... RICHARD MCGHEE... GERALD KLOSSEK... TRACEY MURREY... ERNEST MADRID... WILLIE WRIGHT... ROBERT BOYD... MICHAEL ADAMS

F/51ST LRP '67-'68

DANIEL LINDSAY... JOHN LATTIN... JAN HENRICKSON... RICHARD DIERS... RICHARD RENNOLET... RONNIE ALVORD

E/20TH LRP-C/75TH RANGER 1969

ERIC GOLD... PAUL JORDAN... ELTON VENABLE... DAVID PARKER... HAROLD WILLIAMS... RONALD CARDONA

P/57TH RANGER 1969 DAVID CARTER... FORMERLY WITH F/51ST LRP

NOW LET MY LIFE FROM TWENTY WOUNDS FLOW AND WOLVES MAY DRINK THE BLOOD. MY TIME IS DONE. YOUNG, BRAVE AND SPOTLESS I REJOICE TO GO SIT WHERE ALL THE GODS ARE, IN THE SUN.

LISLE

SGT. ROGER ROBERTS, RVN 67-69


Richard T. Sellers, Jr.
2nd Lt. U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 29 June 1969

This is for my brother Rick.

Rick was a kind and gentle soul with incredible patience.

Rick was my inspiration. He showed me the true meaning of giving. Perhaps that is why I went into the field of public service, law enforcement. He gave the ultimate sacrifice, his life, to people that he really did not even know. He may not have agreed with the war, but he felt it was his duty as a human being to serve his country and the people of Vietnam to try and help their plight.

On June 29th of this year, 30 years to the date of his death, I went to Washington D.C. to see the Vietnam Memorial. After a day of seeing the sights in the nation's capital, I saved the stop to view the Wall for last. It was the most moving experience of my life. All those names of all those other brother's, sister's, mother's and father's whose loved ones are etched on that beautiful memorial to those who so gallantly gave their lives.

In some way it was comforting to know that I and my family, was not the only family, and I was not the only person effected by this tragedy we call the Vietnam War. And I also became angry. All those handsome, funny, sensitive, loving, loved, intelligent and wonderful young human beings had their lives snuffed out, gone no longer able to reach out to us, teach us, lead us, or be able to fulfill their dreams, hopes or expectations that they might have had. These men has so much to offer us. So much to show us and give us. I am sure, that like my brother, they all wanted to be allowed to contribute so much more to all of our lives.

I appreciate all that Rick taught me in life. From teaching me to ride a bike to teaching me that life is full of ups and downs and that things not always work out the way we want them to, or expect. I miss him every day and think about him. I wonder what life would have been like had he come back home. How many children he and his lovely wife would have had? What kind of a career would he have chosen, would he have gone into teaching, politics or business? All sorts of never to be answered questions.

I know that he is always watching over me, and I consider him to be one of my Guardian Angels. And that is a very comforting thought.

I miss you Ricky.

Love,
your little sister,
Peggy

He served in Vietnam from February 1969 until the date of his death June 29, 1969. He was part of the 23rd Infantry, Bravo Company


Antonio Mendez Garcia
PFC U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA March 2 1969

Private First Class Antonio Mendez Garcia was killed in action on March 2nd, 1969 in Hua Nghia, South Vietnam.

Tony died from an undetermined explosion. He was 23 years old and married at the time of his death. Tony was born on July 3rd, 1945 in Needles, California.

If anyone remembers him please contact me, Dan Wilson, at docwil@ayrix.net

Thank you.


JAMES "Jim" DONALD WALLACE II
CWO 2 Helicopter Pilot
101st Airborne Div.
Call sign "Black Widow 25"
10-14-47 / 06-26-99

It saddens my heart to add Jim's name to the TAPS LISTING, Jim was my best friend for over 20 years.

Please indulge me for a few minutes while I tell you about a friendship between a "JARHEAD & a "WINGWIPER".

I first met Jim and Liz around 1973 shortly after they moved to Dallas, Texas. It was instant friendship, we both had so much in common, both being "in country", both of us loved hunting & fishing, the outdoors and the fact we came back in one piece.

For the next 10-15 years we played bridge on Friday nites, went to the farm on Saturday or Sunday to fish, and had dinner together with friends at least 1-2 times a week. It was on those Saturdays or Sundays that we would talk about our experiences in VN while fishing, in those days there were not many people who "WE" as vets could talk to about the "WAR" no one to spill our guts to, no one would listen. Jim talked about his time at flight school at Ft. Wolters in Mineral Wells, Tx. He told me about the time he was soloing and buzzed a lake house on Possum Kingdom Lake. He was on an imaginary "gun run" got so involved he almost forgot to "pull up". He said he could see the people having brakefast and upon seeing this helicopter coming at them dove under the table, luckily they did not get his tail number.

We fished in the hottest Texas weather, and the coldest, fished in Arkansas, Oklahoma and all over Texas but fishing at the farm was our time together. Jim told me of his experiences "flying over the fence", once his co-pilot asked how come "the coordinates" weren't on his map"? Jim's reply was, "they just continued off the map page" Black Widow 25 was often called for by Special Forces because he would fly into shit that no other pilot would fly into, hence the "SILVER STAR, 3 DFC's & BRONZE STAR."

Jim touched my life and the life of others he came into contact with over the years, and was the greatest influence in my returning to college and graduated. We both graduated from the Univ of Texas @ Dallas, Jim of course W/honors in accounting and passed the CPA exam on the first try.

About 1993 Jim was diagnosised as having MS, from spraying "Agent Orange", from that time on I saw a healthy, full of life, spit in your eye man slowly die. At first he had a hard time walking, then came the wheel chair, then one side of his body died, finally he was totally bed ridden.

On 26June99, he told Liz he was going to take a nap, he never woke up... A part of me died that day. Liz took Jim's ashes to Badger Mountain, near Wenatchee, WA., where he proposed to her, there along with Larry one of Jim's best friends & brother pilot in "The Nam" sent Jim on his last mission. Black Widow 25 will never be forgotten.

During the years we had the Marine Corps Birthday at my house and Jim was the only "Army Type" to ever attend, because he "is" one of the few & the proud. I pinned one of my globe & anchors to his lapel before he was cremated, Jim will always be a 'MARINE" !!!

Here is a salute to Jim and all the other veterans who died from exposure to "Agent Orange" that our government denies, you men & women are the real heros of this country.

"YOU GAVE YOUR ALL"

SEMPER FI, MI AMIGO

Bill Priest
call sign "UGLY STICK"


Robert O. Hill, Jr.
U.S. Army CWO2
Born: 10FEB48
Died: 27SEP70

Where do I start? He always wanted to fly and he was proud of the job he was doing flying medical evacuation in the Phu Bai/Quang Tri area of I Corps.

Bobby, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on February10th, 1948, was the oldest of two sons and two daughters. He grew up in Oreland and Churchville, Pennsylvania. He was a 1965 graduate from Council Rock High School in Newtown, Pennsylvania. After working for the Bell Telephone Company, he enlisted in the Army. Following graduation from helicopter flight school, he was sent to Germany for a year and then to Vietnam, where he served with the 237th and 571st Medical Detachments (DUSTOFFF). For his service in Vietnam, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal with three oak leaf clusters, and the Bronze Star.

Though only thirteen months apart, he is, was, and always will be, my "big brother." We served in Vietnam at the same time and were fortunate to get together several times. Those meetings are my most treasured memories. Each time we parted, he'd tell me "Be careful and keep your head down." He died two months after I got home. Even after 28 years, his death continues to haunt me and my two sisters. Laura Palmer, in the introduction to her book, Shrapnel in the Heart, states "Time occasionally makes loss more bearable. But for siblings, their own passage through life is a jarring reminder of just how much their brother missed." This, perhaps, says it all for me. Many of our brothers never had the pleasure of going to college, marrying, buying a house, raising children, becoming grandparents. I truly miss what could have been: large family reunions, joint family vacations, picnics, holiday dinners together and all the other things that brothers do. We siblings are the survivors, but it's a long and often lonely road we travel.

In many respects, time literally stopped with the notification of Bobby's death. Amid the pain and sadness, I will always have our wonderful childhood memories: the endless hours of ping pong and tennis, fun times camping and fishing, walks to the bus stop together, new bikes for Christmas, our favorite oldies from the early 60's, dating the Griffith sisters, and him teaching me to drive his '61 Chevy. If I could have him back, it would always be his turn to run the train set, and my turn to mow the lawn.

Bobby, I can't begin to tell you how much we all miss you. Every year Council Rock H.S. has a memorial service on Veterans' Day for all of our classmates who were killed in action. Cindy gave a wonderful presentation at the 1995 ceremony and she was terrific. You would have been so proud of her. At one point, she said, "My brother, Bob, is one of the boys on this wall, and I say "boys" because that's what they were probably not much older than most of the students here today." This is the most tragic aspect of the war. Our brothers were so young, too young. She mentioned us serving in Vietnam and said, "I know it's been very difficult on Bruce, knowing he made it home and Bobby didn't." Yes, my brother, very difficult indeed. If I could trade places with you, I would.

Mindy has been in contact with at least twenty people that knew you in Vietnam, nurses and fellow pilots. All speak highly of you. They, too, have not and will not forget you. The stories they have related to us have reinforced what we already knew: that you were a caring, and dedicated young man, willing to do whatever it took to save your comrades. One fellow pilot told us, "Bob was my co-pilot on one of the worst days we flew there. On that day Bob and our crew evacuated about 100 wounded men from LZ Holkum while under heavy mortar attack. Each flight out we took only enough fuel to fly out and back without any reserve because we frequently had over 15 patients on board." Such comments make us miss you all the more.

My wife, Nancy, and daughters, Kristin and Kim, know all about you. I'd like to share an essay that Kim wrote at age 17, during competition for a college scholarship. She could have chosen to write about anyone, but she chose YOU!


If you could have dinner with anyone in the world, who would it be?
by Kimberly A. Hill

Of the millions of people in the world, there is one person that I would give anything to meet and have dinner with. The same person is one that I will never be able to meet in my lifetime. My uncle Bobby was a hero. He died fighting for his country in Vietnam. For as long as I can remember I have heard stories, seen pictures, and heard audiotapes he sent home from Vietnam. These things Have given me a special connection to my uncle and a special love that transcends time.

I can remember a special trip to DC quite vividly. It was a warm spring day and The bustle of activity in Washington, DC, captivated my attention. There were men dressed in black leather riding loud Harley-Davidsons down the street. The sidewalks were lined with trucks selling everything from hotdogs to tee shirts. The faint sounds of a concert in the distance drifted over the chaotic chatter of passersby. I was only seven years old and my small hand grasped my dad's in an effort to remain together. My dad wore his army fatigues and I proudly wore his Green Beret and carried a small American flag to leave at the wall we had come to visit. After a long walk we arrived at the long, black granite wall.

"This is it," my dad said, his smiling face becoming somewhat somber, "the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial." We walked down a stone path alongside the wall, down a slight incline. My dad hoisted me up onto his shoulders and pointed out my uncle's name so I could run my fingers along the granite. As I ran my fingers over his name, Robert O. Hill, Jr., the cut in the smooth stone tickled my fingers. My dad told me stories he remembered of his brother-- how he was always looking for a way to make someone laugh, how they would go camping together when they were Boy Scouts, how he once replaced the contents of the sugar bowl with salt to surprise everyone at breakfast.

I knelt down and placed the miniature flag at the base of the wall. I stood up again. Looking into the wall, I could see the reflection of myself reaching just past the waist of my dad's reflection. His body trembled slightly and the smile had disappeared from his face. I grabbed my dad's hand and looking upwards towards the sun, I mouthed, "Daddy, I love you."

He squeezed my hand and smiled, "I love you too, Brownie-Brown Eyes."

The day my dad and I spent together in DC had a great effect on me, even as a young girl. Seeing the way the loss of my uncle has affected my dad has had a profound effect on my own life. I somehow feel a great attachment to my uncle, someone I have never even known. It is hard to explain how I can have so much love for a man I have never met, but there is a love that grows deep inside of me. It is the love that can send a shiver up my spine each time that I run my fingers along the smooth, black granite wall of the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial. It is the love that makes my thoughts turn to my uncle at the sound of a helicopter nearing overhead. It is a love that stems from seeing the love my dad has for him.

The photographs of my uncle and the rubbing of his name that I made at the wall are the only two material attachments that I have to my uncle. But I also have the memories of my dad and the dreams and stories I have created in my own mind. I know in my heart that my uncle is a hero. No one knows this better than the man whose life my uncle died saving, and the others who served with my uncle in Vietnam. Hearing the gratitude, love, and wonderful memories that these men have of my uncle is comforting.

The flowers and notes that have been left at my uncle's grave by unknown people show how much he is thought of and missed by other people. I believe that the people who were able to meet my uncle were truly blessed. It is an opportunity that I would give anything for. I would love to have even a few minutes to meet my uncle, and tell him how much he is loved, and how greatly he is missed. I would show him my silver locket that holds his picture inside.

We visit you often at the Wall. It is a beautiful tribute to ALL the men and eight women who died so many years ago. The most important thing I want you to know is that you will NEVER be forgotten, my dear brother.

Bruce

Contact Bruce Hill at nhill@erols.com


Richard "Doc" Dugard
PFC U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died September 1993

Richard "Doc"Dugard---PFC U.S.ARMY--MEDIC--Viet Nam 1967-1968

In loving memory of a wonderful funny guy who was a big teddy bear with an enormous heart. My brother was never the same after his tour in Nam. He did indulge abit much but was still a sweetheart of a guy. He died September of 1993 of a skull fracture on a Bronx street leaving only those that knew him and loved him bearing a great loss!

Until we meet again,
your loving sister,
Gail.


David Allen Hickman
CW2 U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 4 December 1969

This is a true story. I know, I'm the one who still needs to know why.

In memory of CW2 DAVID ALLEN HICKMAN - 08/11/46 - 12/04/69

WHY?

I NEVER REALLY KNEW HIM
I CAN'T RECALL HIS NAME
I ONLY KNOW THAT SINCE THAT DAY
I'VE NEVER BEEN THE SAME

WE WERE ON A ROUTINE FLIGHT
WE FLEW SOME VIP
THEY SENT HIM OUT TO MEET US
HE TRADED PLACES WITH ME

THEY SENT ME TO SURVIVAL SCHOOL
WHY I'LL NEVER KNOW
THE ONLY CHOICE THEY GAVE ME
WAS TO PACK A BAG AND GO

WHEN I RETURNED TEN DAY LATER
I FOUND OUT HE HAD DIED
NO ONE EVER SAW THE TEARS
BUT DEEP INSIDE I CRIED

I GUESS SOMEDAY I WILL LEARN
THE ANSWER AS TO WHY
THAT ON THAT DAY GOD CHOSE HIM
INSTEAD OF ME TO DIE

Floyd W. Jiminez
CW3 USAR (Retired)
If you know a member of the family CW2 David Allen Hickman, please have them
contact me at SKYVET6970@aol.com


Jerry F. Icenhour
1stSgt U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died 28 January 1999

At 1330 hours ,on 28 January 1999, 1stSgt Jerry F. Icenhour (US Army ret) crossed the LD on his final patrol. He was a two tour Vietnam Veteran and my best friend.

1stSgt. Paul A. Sakala (US Army ret.)


Larry G Dahl
Spec 4 U.S. Army
359th TC 27th Battalion
Born 6-10-49 KIA 2-23-71
Medal of Honor
USNS Dahl

I would like to list my brother. His name was Larry G. Dahl, spec4, 359th TC, 27th Battalion, Medal of Honor, USNS Dahl. This is in his memory and all the other vets who died. I want them and their families to know they will never be forgotten. I would also like to hear from any living Viet Nam vets or their families.

Larry became a hero when he through himself on a gernade on the back of his gunner truck called Brutus . He saved his buddies. I don't think he really thought about what he was doing he just did it. He will be forever missed. We are very proud of him. He was my brother.

If any of you knew him or knew of him, I would sure like to hear from you

Nola (Dahl) Whetstine


Ray Korzinski
Medic, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died in 1989

This is in tribute to my brother Ray Korzinski who served in Viet Nam in 68-69 as a Medic. He never talked much about the war because it bothered him so much. One thing he did tell me once was he was working in a M.A.S.H. unit and there were many wounded and dying soldiers they were trying to save. There was one soldier on a guerney who appeared to be sleeping and the doctors seemed to be just ignoring him. My brother stopped a doctor and asked why they were not trying to help this particular soldier, the doctor's reply was the soldier had a bullet in his heart and there was nothing could be done and they were just waiting for him to die. That was the most difficult experience Ray had and he was never the same upon his return back to the states.

Ray died because of his service in Viet Nam, he died of cancer in 1989 due to cancer he contracted from agent orange. All the victims of agent orange should be recognized as casualties of the Viet Nam War and get their just dues.

If anybody ever sees this who knew Ray in Viet Nam, I would like to hear from them at ckorz@acclink.com

Our nation will never be the same because of Viet Nam, we grew up too fast and too hard but the price was much too high.

God Bless the men and women who served, fought,and died in a strange land for a reason we still dont understand.


William Ward Hook
SFC, U.S.Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died 19 June 1999
Rest in Peace

William Ward Hook. Left the Army as a SFC after 18 & a half years as an Army Medic. He served 2 tours in Vietnam as a Dustoff Medic and earned numerous medals including the DSC.

He passed from our loving hands to those of our Creators on June 19, 1999, at 15:45 Hrs. PST.

We will miss your presence among us; But your Spirit will live in us forever.

Semper Fidelis........Peace & Prayers,

Your "Brother Of The Heart"
Fred L. Gren


Richard (Rich) Eugene Stanton
HN U.S. Navy
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 3 Feb, 1968
Panel 37E Line 14

Richard Eugene Stanton (Rich) was my best friend in Hospital Corpsmans School in San Diego in 1966. Rich was from Kansas City, Kansas.

Rich was killed in action in Viet Nam on Feb. 3, 1968. I learned of his death when I went through Field Medical School in late 1968, on my way to Viet Nam. That was 31 years ago. I regret that I have never had the guts to tell his family what a good guy he was. He was a good guy and a good friend and I have thought of him every sober day of my life.

I miss him.

Gene McGuire (Big Mac, Sugarfoot) from Alabama.


Robert Thompson
Sergeant, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran

IN LOVING MEMORY OF MY BROTHER "SGT. ROBERT THOMPSON"

I lost my brother to a neurological disability he was one of many exposed to Agent Orange. My brother was 26 when be became ill, and 33 when he took his life because he could not live with his pain and debilitating condition. My brothers flag with all his medals are proudly displayed in our living room.

Robert was a Military Policman as was my husband, and he served two tours of duty in Vietnam---and he was awarded one of the highest honors--whose medals are proudly displayed on the flag that covered his casket.

The medal was the "VIETNAMESE CROSS OF GALLENTRY W/PALM" which was awarded to him from the Vietnamese Government for bravery in action.

My husband M. Thomas Kissen, Jr., (Sgt) also suffers from PTSD from VN.

I am very proud of my brother and husband---and ALL VIETNAM VETS----GOD BLESS THEM/FAMILIES.

Kathleen T. Kissen, RN,C, BSN


John Calvin Sherman
Sergeant, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 2 May 1970

In memory of Sergeant John Calvin Sherman / US Army / KIA 05-02-70 / E-Co Recon/Team D/1stBatt/503d/173d/Airborne Brigade "The Herd" LZ Uplift.

Sergeant Sherman was killed during a firefight while on a recon/long range patrol with Team D. He was only 19 years old at the time of his death.

The times have gone by since then, so long ago, yet it seems like yesterday. You will always be remembered by me and all the others from the teams. Rest in peace brother, we will see you again one day.

Submitted by: Sergeant Dan "Soup" Campbell / Team A


Kenneth "Bones" Vos
Sp4, U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA April 1972

Sp/4 Kenneth "Bones" Vos
1/21 Field Artillery
KIA Long Kahn Provence, April 1972
Posthumous Silver Star, Bronze Star, Purple Heart

Bones,

I will never forget.

Sp/4 Douglas Kingery
"C' Battery 1st Bn, 21st Field Artillery


John Roger Bonnell II
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Rest in Peace

My brother, John Roger Bonnell II, joined the army at the age of 17 (1969). He was not in for very long and he was not declared a hero, but he was my brother. We're only 8 months apart. Whatever happened there, I'll never know but my brother was never the same again. He eventually shot himself, leaving 8 children behind. The pain of post traumatic stress syndrome and peripheral neuropathy from agent orange took its toll. I would like to dedicate this poem to all of the sisters left behind.

IN MEMORY

It has been years since you took your life...
and left me empty and hollow.
My mind can certainly justify your strife....
but the pain makes it all so hard to swallow.

I too, shared your powerful nightmares...
created by our country's demand for service,
I too, shared the isolation and the stares,
from those who were ignorant of post traumatic stress.

I still remember that 17 year old face, so proud...
ready to fight for freedom and justice for all,
Bravely off to war with your head in the clouds...
Determined to be a hero and never fall.

Then you returned, the mirror image of my beloved brother,
With hollow eyes portraying a soul-less mind...
Your body, although in one piece, stilled seemed to suffer,
From unknown atrocities that made you blind.

But being the proud man you are...
You swore that you didn't need help coping.
You'd work it through, no matter how hard,
and you would never complain or walk around moping.

So on with life, four wives and eight children later...
You tried so very hard but could never quite get it together.
And as your sickness became physical, leaving all that pain,
Drugs and drinking were the only things that kept you sane!

With unemployment being your final straw, I understand...
How ending it all seemed so logical for a proud man.
But my brother, my twin...I am truly happy that you are free...
And a day doesn't go by that I don't ache for your company.

Jill Elliott
jillandal@mindspring.com


Pfc. Michael Edward Hopkins
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 4 July 1966

In honor of my brother, Michael Hopkins, KIA July 4, 1966.One of America's heroes.

May you rest in peace.

Navy Cross, Purple Heart

sent in by Tommy Hopkins


Pfc. Gary Lee Hall
U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
KIA/BNR 21 July 1976
In Cambodia

I have had a POW/MIA bracelet since I was 10, ( I am now 27) I have worn it every day. I wore it to prom, carried it through college, I was married with it, I had my son while wearing it, and I live with it daily.

I would give anything to know about this young man who proudly gave his life in service of his country. I have tried the traditional routes and not been terribly successful.

His name was PFC Gary Lee Hall, USMC. Do you know where I can acquire any information about this man?

I will be awaiting any answer you can give me.

Thank you,

Robyn


SP4 Don Leslie Michael
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 8 April 1967
Medal of Honor Recipient

My uncle Don Michael was killed in Vietnam.

He was a recipient of the Medal of honor. He was specialist fourth class, Company C, Fourth Battalion, 503d Infantry 173d Airborne, Served from June 66 and died April 8, 1967.

We are looking for anyone who may have served with him.

Thanks,

Leslie


SSG/Army Claude L. Collins
Conway, SC
512th Trans. Co.

SP4/Army Ronald W. Simmons
Blackwell, OK
512th Trans. Co.

PFC/Army Robert L. Stebner
Streetsboro, OH
57th Trans. Co.

PFC/Army Roy L. Greenage
Marlin, TX
669th Trans. Co.

PFC/Army William A. Gunter
Natchez, LA
523rd Trans. Co.

PVT/Army Lloyd R. Hughey
Circleville, OH
669th Trans. Co.

On the night on September 2, 1967 these seven men were KIA while bringing a convoy from Pleiku to Qui Nhon in the Province Binh Dinh in the country of South Vietnam.

If you served with them or have any information on where I can contact their families please e-mail me at WWesley663@aol.com


Wayne Gehl
Retired Chicago Police Department
Marine Vietnam Veteran
54 yrs of Age
Passed away 6/5/99 at 11:00 P.M.
North Chicago VA Hospital

Wayne is leaving a Wife Lyndia, and two children behind, Ericka, his daughter and Chris his son. They are both in grammar school as Wayne got married later in life.

Wayne served in Vietnam in '67 - '68 and was one of those drafted into the Marine Corps, and let me tell you he loved being a Marine. He was in one of the Arty units up in Khe Shan. He was also a very good homicide detective here in Chicago.

I have known Wayne since I was 10 yrs. old as we went to the same grammar school, and High School here in Chicago. He lived across the street from me then, and lived a half a block away from me now. None of us here moved very far away.

God Bless You Wayne and may the Good Lord always keep you in the palm of his hands. We'll miss you BRO -

Roger - C2JR


Scott Alan Wright
PFC, U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 20 April 1968

Enclosed is a "Tribute" to Scott Alan Wright", Marine PFC, Service No. 4/20/68,Wall ID# 57558.

Scott was from Downers Grove Ill. He was killed in action by small arms fire in Quang Tri on 4/20/68 just 72 days after his start of tour in Viet Nam.

I had a hard won friendship with Scott because of our different views of the world. We started out as bitter enemies. Scott and I had more than one battle, only later to become fast friends. Life is strange that way. Sometimes our enemies can become our friends.

To Scott, from your friend Dave.

In the deepest darkness, I wander Quang Tri alone.
The lost soul of a soldier, who will never find home.

I carry the wound, that stopped my young heart.
I died in a battle, that I didn't start.

No one sees me, or remembers my name.
My wound wont heal, for it festers with blame.

My soul's lost forever, mired in Quang Tri mud.
Quang tree's grow tall, as they feast on my blood.

In the deep jungle I wander, there's a VC that I shot.
He was my enemy, or so I had thought.

Our souls pass in silence, quiet ships in the night.
His soul, lost like mine, finds no harbor light.

I no longer hate him, and wish him no ill,
For we both wander Quang Tri, and we both always will.

For he's the soul of a soldier, who cant find his home.
The lost soul of a soldier, forever alone.


Thomas R. Stringer
Sgt USMC
Sept, 7, 1946 - May 30, 1999
Vietnam Veteran

I have had a link to your page for about a year now, and I prayed the day would never come to add my friend to your Taps.

He had so many buddies from Vietnam, some were lost over the years and some were re-found at Marine Reunions. I know some people have found their way to your page from mine.I think that is truly wonderful. It is with great sadness that I request you add Thomas R. Stringer. I can't recall much about what unit he was in. I do know that on his first tour to Nam he was in Bravo Company. He served two tours in Vietnam starting in 1964.

Some of the information I do know is on a page I created as a tribute to him. http://www.intercom.net/user/baycad/tpage.htm

I am interested in learning all I can about him, as he couldn't talk about the war much. Tom is from Maryland. He had cancer, brain tumors and lung cancer caused by agent orange. This guy was a remarkable person, he gave so much of himself in his youth, that he paid for it the rest of his life.

I love him dearly. May god be with him always.

It would be wonderful to hear from anyone that knew Tom, my email is baycad@shore.intercom.net

Sincerely,

Cathy Downes


Estle V. Johnson
U.S. Air Force
Vietnam and Korean War Veteran
Died in December, 1991

My husband, Estle V. Johnson, USAF, died in December 1991 from Multiple Myeloma, a slow growing cancer of the bone marrow, as a result of his exposure to Agent Orange.

Though his name does not appear on the Wall, he died as a result of service to his country. He was also a veteran of the Korean war.

Thank you,

pjj935@aol.com


Dave Miller
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died in October of 1991

This is a memorial to my wife's uncle.

He served in Vietnam from 1968-1969. We are not sure what unit he was with or exactly where he was stationed. (Her dad will not talk about it.) I tried to post it at the web site but my computer won't support the web mail box. All I can tell you about her uncle is that he came back from the War.

He committed suicide in Oct of 1991 in Twining, Michigan. He was from Omer, Michigan and his name was Dave Miller. We would like to try and talk to anyone who knew and served with him. My wife adored him and, although I met him only once, he seemed to want to talk to me. I was in the service at the time and was getting ready to be deployed to Desert Storm. I guess he felt he could open up to me.

Anyway, I don't know how to try to get in touch with anyone he served with. I do know he was in the Army in the Infantry. I think he may have been stationed in or around Danang. He talked about it quite a bit but did not give many details. I do know that out of all the people he originally shipped out with, he was the only one to come home. At one point he stated that he was the "only white guy in my platoon".

Any help you could give would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you,

Officer Travis Smith, OSU P.D.
Stillwater, Oklahoma


Phillip Wayne Baughn
U.S. Army
6-13-48 to 10-20-69
killed in vietnam
Dayton,Ohio

Phillip was my father. He was killed in Vietnam when I was only 8 mo. old.

He is greatly loved & missed by many.

Angela Baughn-Fleming
mamaflem@aol.com


Ronald Hugh Hall
SSG U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 30 June 1971

Ronald Hugh Hall DOB 6/11/1945 died in Vietnam, Quang Ngai, in the attempt to rescue captured soldier from VC.

SSG Ronald Hall, has been missed greatly.

He was my father that i never got to know, for I was only 8 months old when he died. Please remember him, for I never got the opportunity to.

In God's love,

Bridget and my dad's grand-daughter, Shelby


James F. Ainsworth
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died May 16 1999

James F. Ainsworth, Postal clerk, 50, of Dona Ave, Jackson MS, died of a self inflicted gunshot wound Sunday, May 16th 1999. He was a US Army Veteran of Vietnam, having served with the 101st Airborne. He received several medals including multiple Purple Hearts and a Bronze Star for bravery.

I worked with James, he suffered inside, I am sorry that I did not know anymore than what I just typed from the Newspaper OBIT. I should have reached out further to him. As a Vet myself, I should have seen this coming. Reach out to someone you know, this incident is happening too often for me and might be around the corner for one of your Vet friends.

Thanks for letting me say these things about my brother and your brother,

Bob Slater, 1967-6th Bn 77th FA-25th Inf Div, 1968 108th Arty Grp, 1969 9th Inf Div, 1970-8th Bn 4 FA- 24th Corp Arty.

I arrived in sunny Vietnam on 12-07-67, ended my first tour in June 1969 and returned in Jan 1970 and left in Dec 1970.

Yes, I made it through TET 68, just barely.


Ronald Lee Morrison, Jr.
U.S. Army
Vietnam Veteran
Died June 2 1991

i am nina morrison. my dad fought in vietnam. i'm not sure when he died from cancer almost 8 years ago on june 2nd ,and i want to meet or talk to anyone who might have known him and i was hoping that you could please help me

i would appreciate it very much. his name was ronald lee morrison jr he was in the army at a very young age, i'm not sure when right after college i'm sure he was born aug 1 1951 and passed away june 2 1991

i'm not sure what else to say oh yeah after the army he was put into the navy retired in 91 for a while he was on the uss reves and stationed in hawaii

we then moved to washington state so he could get a bone marrow transplant which did not succeed, but any ways could you please help me find someone who might have known him back then

thank you very much

sincerely

nina morrison


SSgt. Michael E. Hainsworth
U.S. Air Force
Vietnam Veteran
Dec. 5, 1944- Oct. 11, 1972

Michael, a heavy machines mechanic, was sent to the Air Base at Da Nang, Vietnam in January of 1972. His squadron was transfered to Utapoa, Thailand. While off duty on a June day, he was seriously injured while riding aboard an open air bus which was hit by a dump truck.

He was transfered to the hospital on Clark AFB, Phillippines. In Aug. he was airlifted to the main Air Force Hospital at Lackland AFB Texas. My wife and I as well as his mother and father and his wife saw him in the last week of August.

We each expressed our LOVE for him!!! As our work required each of us, we returned home. On Oct. 11, 1972 at about 8:00PM CDST, Michael died from the injuries and complications. Though in harms way while at Da Nang, it was in a non combat area that he received injury enough to bring on death! Since his death I have referred to him as, "My Mechanic In The Sky."


A1C David J. Hainsworth
U.S. Air Force
653rd Air Force Military Police, Binh Thuy
Vietnam Veteran
November 29, 1941 - May 16, 1998

I Have Come Home

As a Military Service person, David was an Air Force Security Policeman, perhaps a strange role for a person of such a kind loving nature, which he had always expressed!

To share David's loving, caring nature with his Vietnam Veterans, I will now quote from words he has written. David wrote, "from my Vietnam experience, I never expected to return home alive and emotionally never have."

Now, I shall speak to all you Vietnam Veterans who are still emotionally not home, what David desires and wishes for all of you! "NOW IS THE TIME TO COME HOME, YES, THIS VERY DAY, MINUTE AND SECOND!!!

On Saturday May 16, 1998, David James Hainsworth's Declaration OF Freedom reads: Valiantly I Elegantly Tried; Now Almighty Memory, "I HAVE COME HOME."

Here again another brother who was in harms way, but it was in a non combat area that having PTSD, that David died!

I am an Air Force Veteran of the Cuban Crisis era and did not have to go to Vietnam.

Thank You for this opportunity to express inner feelings which grow more emotional as the years pass!!!

Formerly A1C Joseph C. Hainsworth Jr. 1230 Gahan Drive
Florissant, Missouri 63031-7806 1-314-839-0332 Or Email
OKJOE@webtv.net


Stephen Lee Traughber
Cpl. U.S. Marine Corps
Vietnam Veteran
KIA 10 September, 1967

In memory Of Cpl. Stephen Lee Traughber, USMC. Hometown, New Albany, Indiana. KIA September 10, 1967 in Quang Tri Province, South VietNam.

Steve was TAD from Co. "E" Kamiseya, Japan. Steve always did his best and gave his all for our country.

Semper Fi, Steve.

A friend and fellow Marine,

William R. O'Brien


Click Here to View Taps Gallery III These were submitted prior to 2 May '99